Catalogue


Conversations in exile : Russian writers abroad /
edited by John Glad ; interviews translated by Richard and Joanna Robin.
imprint
Durham ; London : Duke University Press, 1993.
description
315 p. : ports.
ISBN
0822312778 (alk. paper) 0822312980 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Durham ; London : Duke University Press, 1993.
isbn
0822312778 (alk. paper) 0822312980 (pbk. : alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
Translated from the Russian.
catalogue key
3033840
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-07:
Russian 'emigr'e authors and their writings have generally been considered a separated branch of Russian national literature. Emigration (or often exile) from Russia goes back at least to Prince Kurbsky in the reign of Ivan the Terrible, but contemporary 'emigr'e writers may be rather neatly subdivided into three categories: those who left the newly created Soviet Union in the Civil War of the 1920s; those who left during WW II; and those who have emigrated since 1970. Editor Glad uses this classification in his interviews with 15 writers, from Igor Chinnov to Edward Limonov. Most interviews were conducted in 1988, with brief updates (1990) in some instances. These conversations offer highly interesting insights into the lives, careers, and social contacts of the writers. To be sure, much of the information provided by the authors is subjective, although Glad's questions are well formulated and persistent in cases of evasive replies. An intriguing aspect of several of the interviews is the indication of hostile feelings among two or more of the writers. Alexander Solzhenitsyn comes in for a perceptible share of disapproving comment--particularly on the part of Aleksandr Zinoviev and Vladimir Maximov. Neither writer, however, questions Solzhenitsyn's literary talents or his unquestionable devotion to the Russian people. Appended is a chronology of the emigrations of writers (professional or otherwise), from Prince Kurbsky to the early 1980s, when the emigration rate fell sharply. J. E. Jones; Drake University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1993
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Summaries
Main Description
An entire generation of Russian writers have been living in exile from their homeland. Although today's glasnost has special meaning for many of these banished writers, it does not dissolve their experience of forced separation from their country of origin. In Conversations in Exile , John Glad brings together interviews with fourteen prominent Russian writers in exile, all of whom currently live in the United States, France, or Germany. Conducted between 1978 and 1989, these frank and capitivating interviews provide a rich and complex portrait of a national literature in exile. Glad's introduction situates the three distinct waves of westward emigration in their historical and political framework. Organized by genre, the book begins with discussions with the older generation of writers and then moves on to more recent arrivals: the makers of fantasy and humor, the aesthetes, the moralists, and the realists. Each voice is compelling for its invaluable testimony--some reveal startling insights into the persecution of dissidents under Soviet rule while others address the relationship between creativity, writing, and conditions of exile. Taken together these interviews reveal the range of modern Russian writing and document the personalities and positions that have made Russian writers in emigration so diverse, experimental, and controversial. The Writers Vasily Aksyonov Joseph Brodsky Igor Chinnov Natalya Goranevskaya Frifrikh Gorensetin Roman Goul Yury Ivask Boris Khazanov Edward Liminov Vladimir Makisimov Andrei Siniavsky and Maria Rozanova Sasha Sokolov Vladimir Voinovich Aleksandr Zinoviev Excerpt John Glad : You're a Russian poet but an American essayist. Does that bring on any measure of split personality? Do you think you are becoming less and less Russian? Joseph Brodsky (recipient of 1987 Nobel Prize for Literature): That's not for me to say. As far as I'm concerned, in my inner self, inside, it feels quite natural. I think being a Russian poet and an American essayist is an ideal situation. It's all a matter of whether you have (a) the heart and (b) the brains to be able to do both. Sometimes I think I do. Sometimes I think I don't. Sometimes I think that one interferes with the other.
Main Description
An entire generation of Russian writers have been living in exile from their homeland. Although today'sglasnosthas special meaning for many of these banished writers, it does not dissolve their experience of forced separation from their country of origin. InConversations in Exile, John Glad brings together interviews with fourteen prominent Russian writers in exile, all of whom currently live in the United States, France, or Germany. Conducted between 1978 and 1989, these frank and capitivating interviews provide a rich and complex portrait of a national literature in exile. Glad's introduction situates the three distinct waves of westward emigration in their historical and political framework. Organized by genre, the book begins with discussions with the older generation of writers and then moves on to more recent arrivals: the makers of fantasy and humor, the aesthetes, the moralists, and the realists. Each voice is compelling for its invaluable testimony--some reveal startling insights into the persecution of dissidents under Soviet rule while others address the relationship between creativity, writing, and conditions of exile. Taken together these interviews reveal the range of modern Russian writing and document the personalities and positions that have made Russian writers in emigration so diverse, experimental, and controversial.The Writers Vasily Aksyonov Joseph Brodsky Igor Chinnov Natalya Goranevskaya Frifrikh Gorensetin Roman Goul Yury Ivask Boris Khazanov Edward Liminov Vladimir Makisimov Andrei Siniavsky and Maria Rozanova Sasha Sokolov Vladimir Voinovich Aleksandr ZinovievExcerpt John Glad: You're a Russian poet but an American essayist. Does that bring on any measure of split personality? Do you think you are becoming less and less Russian? Joseph Brodsky(recipient of 1987 Nobel Prize for Literature): That's not for me to say. As far as I'm concerned, in my inner self, inside, it feels quite natural. I think being a Russian poet and an American essayist is an ideal situation. It's all a matter of whether you have (a) the heart and (b) the brains to be able to do both. Sometimes I think I do. Sometimes I think I don't. Sometimes I think that one interferes with the other.
Main Description
In 'Conversation In Exile, ' John Glad brings together interviews with fourteen prominent Russian writers in exile, all of whom currently live in the United States, France, or Germany. Conducted between 1978 and 1989, these frank and captivating interviews provide a rich and complex portrait of a national literature in exile.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Older Generation
Makers of Fantasy and Humor
The Aesthetes
The Moralists
The Realists
A Chronology
Glossary of Names
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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