Catalogue


The Industrial Revolution and the Atlantic economy : selected essays /
Brinley Thomas.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 1993.
description
xxi, 260 p. : ill.
ISBN
0415079780
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 1993.
isbn
0415079780
contents note
Introduction -- Britain's energy crisis in the seventeenth century -- The first Atlantic economy, 1700-1776 -- The end of the Charcoal Iron Age -- Feeding England, 1760-1846 : a view from the Celtic fringe -- Henry Cort and the primacy of Britain -- Robert Owen (1771-1858) -- Demographic determinants of British and American building cyckes, 1870-1913 -- Long swings and the Atlantic economy -- A cauldron of rebirth : the Industrial Revolution and the Welsh language -- A plea for an organic approach to economic growth.
general note
Essays, with some revisions and updating, most of which were previously published in various journals.
catalogue key
3022028
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
In recent years it has become commonplace to downplay notions of an industrial revolution and argue instead that Britain's transformation was gradual and incremental. In The Industrial Revolution and the Atlantic EconomyBrinley Thomas contests this view, arguing that change in the energy base and hence in technology has enabled Britain to overcome an energy crisis and sustain dramatic population growth. Throughout these essays illustrate the organic approach to economic growth that Brinley Thomas pioneered.
Main Description
In recent years, the idea that Britain experienced an industrial revolution has been widely questioned. The new economic history, with its emphasis on quantitative techniques and macro-economic indices, has tended to regard Britain's transformation as a gradual and modest affair which does not deserve the term "revolution." The Industrial Revolution and the Atlantic Economytakes issue with this revisionism. Brinley Thomas argues that a change in technology enabled Britain to overcome the energy crisis and to sustain dramatic population growth at an increasing standard of living. This epoch- making change in the energy base was brought about by substituting fossil fuels for organic materials, thereby ushering in the modern age of coal, iron and petroleum.
Back Cover Copy
In recent years it has become commonplace to downplay notions of an industrial revolution and argue instead that Britain's transformation was gradual and incremental. In The Industrial Revolution and the Atlantic Economy Brinley Thomas contests this view, arguing that change in the energy base and hence in technology has enabled Britain to overcome an energy crisis and sustain dramatic population growth. Throughout these essays illustrate the organic approach to economic growth that Brinley Thomas pioneered.
Long Description
In recent years, the idea that Britain experienced an industrial revolution has been widely questioned. The new economic history, with its emphasis on quantitative techniques and macro-economic indices, has tended to regard Britain's transformation as a gradual and modest affair which does not deserve the term "revolution." "The Industrial Revolution and the Atlantic Economy" takes issue with this revisionism. Brinley Thomas argues that a change in technology enabled Britain to overcome the energy crisis and to sustain dramatic population growth at an increasing standard of living. This epoch- making change in the energy base was brought about by substituting fossil fuels for organic materials, thereby ushering in the modern age of coal, iron and petroleum.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
Introductionp. xv
Referencesp. xxi
Britain's Energy Crisis in the Seventeenth Centuryp. 1
Notesp. 31
The First Atlantic Economy, 1700-76p. 34
The End of the Charcoal Iron Agep. 60
Britain's Food Supply, 1760-1846: The Irish Contributionp. 81
Notesp. 98
Henry Cort and the Primacy of Britainp. 100
Robert Owen (1771-1858): a Hero of the Industrial Revolutionp. 121
Demographic Determinants of British and American Building Cycles, 1870-1913p. 144
Long Swings and the Atlantic Economy: a Reappraisalp. 182
Referencesp. 206
A Cauldron of Rebirth: The Industrial Revolution and the Welsh Languagep. 208
A Plea for an Organic Approach to Economic Growthp. 232
Referencesp. 248
Indexp. 250
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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