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European and Islamic trade in the early Ottoman state : the merchants of Genoa and Turkey /
Kate Fleet.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
description
x, 204 p.
ISBN
0521642213 (hb)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
isbn
0521642213 (hb)
catalogue key
3014938
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-02:
The early Ottomans are often described as Islamic conquerors who expanded into the Balkans, living off the tribute they squeezed from the conquered peoples. It would seem as though they had no idea about either trade or economic activity. Fleet changes this perception of the Ottomans in the 14th and early 15th centuries by examining their commerce with Genoa. She relies primarily on sources in the Genovese state archives (as there are few Ottoman documents for this period) and presents a detailed account of economic activity between the two states. Thus from the very origins of the Ottoman state, trade was of immense importance to the sultans, and their policy of territorial expansion was influenced partly by their desire to control trade routes. The commodities they exchanged included slaves, grain from Anatolia (described in Western sources as Turchia), wine, alum, cotton and cloth, and metals, including copper. This trade, according to Fleet, contributed "to the early development and success of the Ottoman state." Fleet's rigorously researched monograph will alter the way the history of the Ottomans is perceived and may erode many long-established stereotypes. Upper-division undergraduates and above. F. Ahmad; University of Massachusetts at Boston
Reviews
Review Quotes
' ... a welcome contribution to the Ottoman studies and highlights the early period from an angle that has previously been largely overlooked.' Acta Orientalia
'... a welcome contribution to the Ottoman studies and highlights the early period from an angle that has previously been largely overlooked.'Acta Orientalia
‘… a welcome contribution to the Ottoman studies and highlights the early period from an angle that has previously been largely overlooked.’Acta Orientalia
"Fleet is meticulous researcher. She has extracted a rich lode of information from the Italian archives and the Genoese notarial records in particular. In addition to costs of transport and prices of goods, this documentation provides a picture of everyday institutions and commerical culture...this book contains some useful summaries of specialist knowledge of interest to historians...This book is, as its title states, a concise history. It covers a long time period, from the mid-1600s until approximately 1997...Readers will thus have a well-developed sense of how the facts that they are given fit into the chapter's narrative as a whole...Ross does an excellent job of incorporating the conclusions of numerous small-scale social historical studies, which have often provided the cutting edge to South Africa." African and the Middle East
"Fleet's rigorously researched monograph will alter the way the history of the Ottomans is perceived and may erode many long-established stereotypes." Choice
'... meticulously written ... a solid piece of scholarship, the book will be much used by future scholars.' Studia Orientalia
'... meticulously written ... a solid piece of scholarship, the book will be much used by future scholars.'Studia Orientalia
‘… meticulously written … a solid piece of scholarship, the book will be much used by future scholars.’Studia Orientalia
'... the work conveys a new perspective on early Ottoman history and the Eastern Mediterranean of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Most importantly, Fleet has cogently brought the economy back in to the early Ottoman narrative.' Mediterranean Historical Review
'... the work conveys a new perspective on early Ottoman history and the Eastern Mediterranean of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Most importantly, Fleet has cogently brought the economy back in to the early Ottoman narrative.'Mediterranean Historical Review
‘… the work conveys a new perspective on early Ottoman history and the Eastern Mediterranean of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Most importantly, Fleet has cogently brought the economy back in to the early Ottoman narrative.’Mediterranean Historical Review
"The work thus accomplished is impressive - un travail de bén^'edictin - and constitutes an invaluable contribution to the underdeocumented economic history of the region...Fleet's study deserves unquestionable praise for the courage and determination shown in exploring and revealing a wealth of documentation on this understudied area of Anatolian economic history." Journal of Economic History
"This book makes a substantial contribution to our knowledge of the material relationships between eastern Mediterranean societies during the early modern period of European history...the book has the potential to ignite a good argument about Mediterranean commercial capitalism during the period of history that she wished to enliven." Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"...This book represents impressive work with published and unpublished primary sources. I expect that Mediterranean medievalist will be able to mine it for archival gold." International Journal Middle of East Studies
"This is a valuable work; I have already put it to good use in my own work." Mesa Bulletin, Palmira Brummet, University of Tennessee
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2000
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Kate Fleet offers a rare insight into the Ottoman state's economic aspirations and eventual integration into the economy of the Mediterranean basin.
Description for Bookstore
By focusing on the trading partnership between the Genoese and the Turks, the author demonstates how this interaction contributed to the economic development of the early Ottoman state. The book considers the economic aspirations of the early Ottomans and their integration into the economy of the Mediterranean basin.
Description for Bookstore
By using untapped Latin and Turkish sources, and focusing on the trading partnership between the Genoese and the Turks, Kate Fleet demonstrates how this interaction contributed to the economic development of the early Ottoman state and to Ottoman territorial expansion. Where previous literature has emphasised the military prowess of the early Ottomans and their role as 'the infidel', the book considers their economic aspirations and their integration into the economy of the Mediterranean basin. This is a readable and authoritative study which illuminates an obscure period in early Ottoman history.
Main Description
By using untapped Latin and Turkish sources, and focusing on the trading partnership between the Genoese and the Turks, Kate Fleet demonstrates how this interaction contributed to the economic development of the early Ottoman state and to Ottoman territorial expansion. Where previous literature has emphasized the military prowess of the early Ottomans and their role as "the infidel," this book considers their economic aspirations and their integration into the economy of the Mediterranean basin. This readable, authoritative study illuminates an obscure period in early Ottoman history.
Main Description
International trade was of great importance for the Ottomans in the construction of their empire. Kate Fleet's book examines the trade links which existed between European merchants and their Muslim counterparts from the beginnings of the Ottoman empire in 1300 to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. By using previously unexploited Latin and Turkish sources, and by focusing on the trading partnership between the Genoese and the Turks, she demonstrates how this interaction contributed to the economic development of the early Ottoman state and, indeed, to Ottoman territorial expansion. Where other studies have emphasized the military prowess of the early Ottoman state and its role as 'the infidel enemy', the book offers an insight into its economic aspirations and eventual integration into the economy of the Mediterranean basin. This is a readable, authoritative and innovative study which illuminates our understanding of an obscure period in early Ottoman history.
Table of Contents
List of tables
Acknowledgements
List of abbreviations
Introduction
Historical outline
Money
Commodities
Slaves
Grain
Wine
Alum
Cloth
Metals
The fall of Constantinople and Ottoman-Genoese relations after 1453
Conclusion: the Latin contribution to the early Ottoman economy
Appendices
Glossary
Place names
Select Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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