Catalogue


Environment and ethnicity in India, 1200-1991 /
Sumit Guha.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
description
xv, 217 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0521640784 (hb)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
isbn
0521640784 (hb)
catalogue key
3014905
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-03:
Guha argues that group identities have profoundly affected tribal destinies from early history on. These identities usually have been imposed from outside, and environmental factors, specifically the use of land, invariably have determined the identification process. Guha traces the history of several archetypical tribal communities like the Bedas, Bhils, and Gonds of western and central India and finds a long history of active participation in the politics of their respective regions. Tribal leaders fought and negotiated for centuries with the Sultanate of Gujarat, the Portuguese Estado, the Mughal Empire, the Maratha States, the British Empire, and the Republic of India. Only in comparatively recent times with the "centralizing drives" of modern governments has tribal participation been curtailed. Guha contends that pubic attention for endangered species and ecosystems ought to include a parallel concern for endangered cultures. South Asian historians and anthropologists will find this work a mine of information on the medieval period especially, when the Bhils were deeply integrated into the political economy of their region. Well written and well documented, with complete bibliography and index, this study is a significant contribution to knowledge of a heretofore thinly researched aspect of South Asian history and development. Upper-division undergraduates and above. W. W. Reinhardt; Randolph-Macon College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a significant contribution to knowledge of a heretofore thinly researched aspect of South Asian history and development." Choice
"...this book is a major contribution to the historiography of South Asia."The Historian
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2000
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Summaries
Main Description
Drawing on a rich collection of sources, Sumit Guha’s book reconstructs the history of the forest communities in western India to explore questions of tribal identity and the environment. In so doing, he demonstrates how the ideology of indigenous cultures, developed out of the notion of a pure and untouched ethnicity, is in fact rooted in nineteenth-century racial and colonial anthropology. As a challenge to this view, the author traces the processes by which the apparently immutable identities of South Asian populations took shape, and how these populations interacted politically, economically and socially with civilizations outside their immediate vicinity. While such theories have been discussed by scholars of South-East Asia and Africa, this study examines the South Asian case. Sumit Guha’s penetrating and controversial critique will make a significant contribution to that literature.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Drawing on a rich collection of sources, Guha reconstructs the history of the forest communities in western India to explore questions of tribal identity and the environment. He contends that current thinking is rooted in 19th century anthropology.
Description for Bookstore
Guha reconstructs the history of forest communities in western India to explore questions relating to identity and the environment. In this way he demonstrates how the ideology of indigenous cultures, developed out of the notion of a pure and untouched ethnicity, is rooted in racial and colonial anthropology. His penetrating critique will contribute significantly to the literature.
Description for Bookstore
Guha reconstructs the history of forest communities in western India to explore questions relating to identity and the environment. In this way he demonstrates how the ideology of indigenous cultures, developed over recent years, is rooted in racial and colonial anthropology. His penetrating critique will contribute significantly to the literature.
Description for Bookstore
This 1999 book reconstructs the history of forest communities in western India to explore questions relating to identity and the environment. It demonstrates how the ideology of indigenous cultures, developed out of the notion of a pure and untouched ethnicity, is rooted in racial and colonial anthropology. This penetrating critique will contribute significantly to the literature.
Description for Library
Drawing on a rich collection of sources, Sumit Guha demonstrates how the ideology of indigenous cultures, developed out of the notion of a pure and untouched ethnicity, is in fact rooted in nineteenth-century racial and colonial anthropology. Challenging this view, he traces the processes by which the apparently immutable identities of South Asian populations took shape, and how these populations interacted with civilizations beyond their immediate vicinity. His penetrating critique will make a significant contribution to the history of South Asia and to the literature on ethnicity.
Main Description
Drawing on a rich collection of sources, Sumit Guha demonstrates how the ideology of indigenous cultures, developed in recent years out of the notion of a pure and untouched ethnicity, is in fact rooted in nineteenth-century racial and colonial anthropology. Challenging this view, he traces the processes by which the apparently immutable identities of South Asian populations took shape, and how these populations interacted with civilizations beyond their immediate vicinity. His penetrating critique will make a significant contribution to the history of South Asia and to the literature on ethnicity.
Main Description
Drawing on a rich collection of sources, Sumit Guha's 1999 book reconstructs the history of the forest communities in western India to explore questions of tribal identity and the environment. In so doing, he demonstrates how the ideology of indigenous cultures, developed out of the notion of a pure and untouched ethnicity, is in fact rooted in nineteenth-century racial and colonial anthropology. As a challenge to this view, the author traces the processes by which the apparently immutable identities of South Asian populations took shape, and how these populations interacted politically, economically and socially with civilizations outside their immediate vicinity. While such theories have been discussed by scholars of South-East Asia and Africa, this study examines the South Asian case. Sumit Guha's penetrating and controversial critique will make a significant contribution to that literature.
Main Description
Drawing on a rich collection of sources, Sumit Guha's book reconstructs the history of the forest communities in western India to explore questions of tribal identity and the environment. In so doing, he demonstrates how the ideology of indigenous cultures, developed out of the notion of a pure and untouched ethnicity, is in fact rooted in nineteenth-century racial and colonial anthropology. As a challenge to this view, the author traces the processes by which the apparently immutable identities of South Asian populations took shape, and how these populations interacted politically, economically and socially with civilizations outside their immediate vicinity. While such theories have been discussed by scholars of South-East Asia and Africa, this study examines the South Asian case. Sumit Guha's penetrating and controversial critique will make a significant contribution to that literature.
Table of Contents
'Rama, Sita and Lukshmana in the forest'
List of maps
List of tables
Acknowledgements
Glossary
List of abbreviations
Introduction
From the archaeology of mind to the archaeology of matter
Subsistence and predation at the margins of cultivation
State formation in the highland forests, 1350-1800
The peoples of the Sahyadri under Marathas and British
The central Indian forest from Mughal suzerainty to British control
The central Indian forest under early British rule
Identity and aspiration: not noble savage but savage noble
The high colonial period and after: new patterns of authority and power
From sanctuaries to safeguards: policies and politics in twentieth-century India
Conclusion
Afterword
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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