Catalogue


Profiles of a lost world : memoirs of East European Jewish life before World War II /
Hirsz Abramowicz ; translated by Eva Zeitlin Dobkin ; edited by Dina Abramowicz and Jeffrey Shandler ; with introductions by David E. Fishman and Dina Abramowicz.
imprint
Detroit, Mich. : Wayne State University Press, c1999.
description
386 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0814327842
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-10-01:
Poland before WW II contained the largest Jewish community in Europe, with nearly three- and-a-half million individuals. The Germans killed 90 percent of Polish Jews during the Holocaust. In contrast to Western Europe, whose Jews assimilated, Polish Jews formed separate ethnic communities. One of the most creative was in Vilna, the "Jerusalem of Lithuania." In this work Abramowicz, who survived the Holocaust and who had been a prominent educator and writer, presents a detailed description of Yiddish culture from before WW I through the 1930s. Invited by his brother to visit him in Canada, Abramowicz was unable to return to Poland and thus survived the Holocaust, which claimed his wife as a victim. The essays in this volume, stemming from the author's newspaper and journal articles, were originally published in a Yiddish edition in Buenos Aires in 1958. They range from a discussion of the German occupation during WW I to one on the diet of Lithuanian Jews. One section presents brief biographies of leading Lithuanian Jewish figures. This valuable collection provides a concrete picture of a lost world. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. M. Kren Kansas State University
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1999
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Essays by a Jewish teacher, activist, & author offer a rare account of Eastern European Jewry before the Holocaust.
Unpaid Annotation
First published in a Yiddish edition in 1958, Profiles of a Lost World is an incomparable source of information about Eastern Europe before World War II as well as an invaluable touchstone for understanding a rich and complex cultural environment. Hirsz Abramowicz (1881-1960), a prominent Jewish educator, writer, and cultural activist, knew that world and wrote about it, and his writings provide a rare eyewitness account of Jewish life during the first half of the twentieth century.Abramowicz was a witness to war, revolution, and major cultural transformations in the Jewish world. His essays, written and originally published in Yiddish between 1920 and 1955, document the local history of Lithuanian Jewry in rural and small-town settings, and in the city of Vilna -- the "Jerusalem of Lithuania" -- which was a major center of East European Jewish intellectual and cultural life. They shed important light on the daily life of Jews and the flourishing of modern Yiddish culture in Eastern Europe during the early twentieth century and offer a personal perspective on the rise of Jewish radical politics.The collection incorporates local history of Lithuanian Jewry, shtetl folklore, observations on rural occupations, Jewish education, and life under German occupation during World War I. It also includes a series of profiles of leading social and intellectual Jewish personalities of the authors day, from traditional scholars to revolutionaries. Together the selections provide a unique blend of social and personal history and a window on a lost world.
Main Description
First published in a Yiddish edition in 1958, Profiles of a Lost World is a source of information about Eastern Europe before World War II as well as an touchstone for understanding a rich and complex cultural environment. Hirsz Abramowicz (1881-1960), a prominent Jewish educator, writer and cultural activist, knew that world and wrote about it, and his writings provide an eyewitness account of Jewish life during the first half of the twentieth century. Abramowicz was a witness to war, revolution and major cultural transformations in the Jewish world. His essays, written and originally published in Yiddish between 1920 and 1955, document the local history of Lithuanian Jewry in rural and small-town settings, and in the city of Vilna-the "Jerusalem of Lithuania"-which was a major center of East European Jewish intellectual and cultural life. They shed light on the daily life of Jews and the flourishing of modern Yiddish culture in Eastern Europe during the early 20th century and offer a personal perspective on the rise of Jewish radical politics. The collection incorporates local history of Lithuanian Jewry, shtetl folklore, observations on rural occupations, Jewish education, and life under German occupation during World War I. It also includes a series of profiles of leading social and intellectual Jewish personalities of the author's day, from traditional scholars to revolutionaries. Together the selections provide a blend of social and personal history and a window on a lost world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work is a source of information about Eastern Europe before World War II. Hirsz Abramowicz knew that world and wrote about it, and his writings provide an eyewitness account of Jewish life during the first half of the 20th century.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. 7
Introductionp. 9
My Father's Life and Workp. 18
Note from the Editorsp. 36
Lithuanian Jewish Traditionsp. 39
Rural Jewish Occupations in Lithuaniap. 41
A Lithuanian Shtetlp. 77
The Diet of Lithuanian Jewsp. 99
Healing the Mentally Illp. 109
Reform and Upheaval before World War Ip. 115
Joshua Steinbergp. 117
Samuel Gozhanskip. 124
Chaim Fialkovp. 126
Hirsh Lekert and His Timesp. 132
Anna Lifshitsp. 143
In Tsarist Jailsp. 147
Jewish Gymnasia without Quotasp. 158
I. L. Peretz Visits the Jewish Writers in Odessap. 162
Chaim Weizmann and Kolia Tepper Debatep. 169
World War I and Its Aftermath in and around Vilnap. 175
I Join the Militiap. 177
The Germans in World War Ip. 182
April 1919p. 209
Jewish Vocational Education between the World Warsp. 219
The Vilna "Help Through Work" Societyp. 221
Jewish Agricultural School in Wielucianyp. 229
The Bialystok Vocational Schoolp. 240
Matthias Schreiberp. 243
Profiles of Vilna Jewry before World War IIp. 249
Mark Antokolskyp. 251
Khaykl Lunskip. 260
Samuel Hurwiczp. 265
Eliezer Krukp. 269
B. Kahan-Wirgilip. 276
Joseph Jaszunskip. 280
Joseph Czernichow (Danieli)p. 285
Gershon Malakiewiczp. 289
Chief Rabbi Isaac Rubinsteinp. 292
Dr. Cemach Szabadp. 297
Dr. Jacob Wygodzkip. 301
A. Weiterp. 306
Zalmen Reisenp. 313
Moshe Shalitp. 321
Glossaryp. 327
Endnotesp. 333
Place-namesp. 357
Periodicals Mentioned in the Textp. 359
Bibliographyp. 361
Indexp. 367
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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