Catalogue


Theatre in the Victorian Age /
Michael R. Booth.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
description
[x], 218 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521343518 (hard) 0521348374 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
isbn
0521343518 (hard) 0521348374 (pbk.)
catalogue key
300686
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-05:
Michael Booth is a prominent theater scholar who, almost alone, brought 19th-century theater studies out of oblivion. His Hiss the Villain (London, 1964) contained 6 melodramas and English Plays of the Nineteenth Century (5 v., 1969-76), included 33 plays from various genres. Booth has written extensive criticism of the period in all the scholarly journals. This book is a fascinating account of selected aspects of Victorian theater that will be of interest to students and general readers. Booth discusses changing social attitudes to theater, its management, the playhouses, production techniques, and the actors. The last chapter is concerned with representative dramatists. There are black-and-white illustrations, some of them theater posters. There is no bibliography as such; at the end of the book is a section called "Sources," which is an annotated bibliography of "books that might be helpful for further reading." Theater students at all levels will find this work valuable, particularly when Booth deals with such topics as fire protection, sanitation, wages, points, and lines of business. A book on such little-noted but important subjects would be welcome.-G. B. Cross, Eastern Michigan University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Booth's extensive knowledge of the field is evident throughout; he organizes a great amount of interesting information, and recounts it in a relaxed, conversational style." Essays in Theatre
"Booth's extensive knowledge of the field is evident throughout; he organizes a great amount of interesting information, and recounts it in a relaxed, conversational style."Essays in Theatre
"Booth's latest contribution to the field is both fascinating and authoritative... Both [Booth's book and Stephens's book, The Profession of the Playwright: British Theatre 1800-1900] will come to occupy well-deserved places as standard works of nineteenth-century social and theatre history." Victorian Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1992
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Summaries
Main Description
This book examines all major aspects of theater practice and dramatic literature of the Victorian period. Michael Booth's comprehensive survey explores the social and cultural context of the theater including theater management, the audience, architecture and production methods, acting and the job of the actor, as well as the drama itself. Within this framework, Booth discusses such topics as the effect on theater of population growth and the spread of the railway system, the typical organization of a Victorian theater company, the contribution to theater of several important actor-managers, the use of stage machinery and lighting instruments, and the stock company and rehearsal system. The volume also includes a chapter on sources, numerous previously unpublished illustrations, and a chronology. The result is a lively and informative account of the diversity, energy, and color of the Victorian stage, the whole period comprising one of the most fascinating and vigorous eras in the history of the English theater.
Main Description
This book examines all major aspects of theatre practice and dramatic literature of the Victorian period. Michael Booth's comprehensive survey explores the social and cultural context of the theatre including theatre management, the audience, architecture and production methods, acting and the job of actor, as well as the drama itself. Within this framework, Booth discusses such topics as the effect on theatre of population growth and the spread of the railway system, the typical organization of a Victorian theatre company, the contribution to theatre of several important actor-managers, the use of stage machinery and lighting instruments, and the stock company and rehearsal system. The volume also includes a chapter on sources, numerous previously unpublished illustrations, and a chronology. The result is a lively and informative account of the diversity, energy, and colour of the Victorian stage. Theatre in the Victorian Age will be of interest to students and scholars of theatre history, Victorian studies, cultural history and literature.
Description for Library
This book examines all major aspects of theatre practice and dramatic literature of the Victorian period. Michael Booth's comprehensive survey explores the social and cultural context of the theatre including theatre management, the audience, architecture and production methods, acting and the job of actor, as well as the drama itself. The volume also includes a chapter on sources, numerous previously unpublished illustrations, and a chronology. The result is a lively and informative account of the diversity, energy, and colour of the Victorian stage.
Description for Bookstore
This book examines all major aspects of theatre practice and dramatic literature of the Victorian period. Michael Booth's comprehensive survey explores the social and cultural context of the theatre including theatre management, the audience, architecture and production methods, acting and the job of actor, as well as the drama itself.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Chronologyp. xv
Theatre and societyp. 1
Audiences and social classp. 2
Population growth and new theatresp. 3
Audience compositionp. 6
The music hallp. 11
Railwaysp. 14
Provincial theatresp. 16
Touring companiesp. 18
Religious attitudes to theatrep. 21
Managementp. 27
Managerial responsibilitiesp. 28
Motivation and capital investmentp. 31
Company organisation and expensesp. 33
Revenue and pricing policyp. 38
Macreadyp. 41
Vestrisp. 44
Phelpsp. 46
Charles Keanp. 47
Calvert and Sakerp. 49
Wilton and Bancroftp. 52
Irvingp. 54
Dominance of the actor-managerp. 55
Playhouse and productionp. 58
The auditoriump. 58
Sanitationp. 66
Safety and fire protectionp. 67
The stage and stage machineryp. 70
Scene-paintingp. 80
Lighting and scenic effectp. 82
Sound effectsp. 93
Technical rehearsalsp. 94
Pictorialism and archaeologyp. 95
Realismp. 96
The actorp. 99
Going on stagep. 99
Workloadp. 102
Rehearsalsp. 104
Touring company employmentp. 109
The West End actorp. 111
Actressesp. 112
Costume and makeupp. 114
Wagesp. 117
Pictorialisation and elevationp. 120
Vocal delivery and musicp. 121
Acting spacep. 124
The pointp. 125
The stock company and lines of businessp. 125
Melodramatic actingp. 129
Transvestism and durationp. 130
Realism, refinement and the domesticp. 131
Approaches to actingp. 133
Psychologyp. 137
Dramatists and the dramap. 141
Income and copyrightp. 142
Censorship and audience tastep. 145
Tragedyp. 148
Knowlesp. 149
Melodramap. 150
Middle-class prejudicep. 162
Class hatredp. 163
Business crimep. 164
Boucicaultp. 167
Ibsenp. 169
Jones and Pinerop. 174
Shaw and Wildep. 176
Comedyp. 178
Robertsonp. 182
Byronp. 184
Gilbertp. 185
1890s comedyp. 187
Farcep. 189
Planche and extravaganzap. 194
Burlesquep. 196
Pantomimep. 198
Sourcesp. 203
Indexp. 210
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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