Catalogue


Media and public policy /
edited by Robert J. Spitzer.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1993.
description
xi, 235 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0275943038 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1993.
isbn
0275943038 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3006821
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-228) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-06:
The topic of this book is narrower, but also less integrated, than the title may suggest. Its dozen essays are chiefly concerned with one medium (television), and they focus almost exclusively on journalism. Two contributors address public policy questions that affect mass media: W. Williams Jr. charts FCC policy shifts in relation to commissioner backgrounds, D. Alger makes a spirited case for stronger barriers to journalistic invasions of privacy. The rest look at ways public policy is affected by mass media--mainly via the effects of news on public opinion. R. Sahr perceptively examines conditions that determine to whom journalists turn for "expert" opinion. Others discuss a disparate array of subjects (the 1990 Gantt-Helms Senate race, reporters' knowledge of AIDS, newspaper advocacy of an economic development project in Iowa, the impact of news coverage on environmental policy, more experimental evidence on the comparative efficacy of television and print as sources of information) and offer some inconsistent and often surprisingly muddy theorizing. Though all papers have some merit, none breaks new ground and nothing ties one to any of the others. This is journal literature disguised as a book. Few will want to read everything; most will do better to go to the field's journals themselves. A. P. Simonds; University of Massachusetts at Boston
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Political scientists and media specialists accept the commonplace assumption that the mass media have a profound and direct impact on virtually every aspect of the political process, yet remarkably few systematic studies examining the relationship between media and policy exist. Media and Public Policy brings together 15 prominent scholars who focus analytic attention on the underexamined connection between the media and public policymaking. Part I, which addresses theoretical perspectives, includes a chapter on media impact on the political status quo by leading expert Doris A. Graber and another on newsmaking and policymaking by Julio Borquez. Part II, Media and Domestic Policy, includes chapters on FCC decisions (Wenmouth Williams, Jr.), understanding public policy through news broadcasts (Marion Just and Ann Crigler), the role the media plays in economic development and agenda setting (Michael Hawthorne), and media and the right to privacy (Dean Alger). Jerry and Michael Medler contribute a chapter about media images as environmental policy, and Montague Kern examines the rhetoric of public policy issues in mass media elections. In the final section, Robert Sahr and Patrick O'Heffernan discuss mass media and U.S. foreign policy processes in two chapters, and Holli Semetko and Edie Goldenberg examine how AIDS reporters in several countries use the media to affect policymaking.
Long Description
Political scientists and media specialists accept the commonplace assumption that the mass media have a profound and direct impact on virtually every aspect of the political process, yet remarkably few systematic studies examining the relationship between media and policy exist. Media and Public Policy brings together 15 prominent scholars who focus analytic attention on the underexamined connection between the media and public policymaking. Part I, which addresses theoretical perspectives, includes a chapter on media impact on the political "status quo" by leading expert Doris A. Graber and another on newsmaking and policymaking by Julio Borquez. Part II, Media and Domestic Policy, includes chapters on FCC decisions (Wenmouth Williams, Jr.), understanding public policy through news broadcasts (Marion Just and Ann Crigler), the role the media plays in economic development and agenda setting (Michael Hawthorne), and media and the right to privacy (Dean Alger). Jerry and Michael Medler contribute a chapter about media images as environmental policy, and Montague Kern examines the rhetoric of public policy issues in mass media elections. In the final section, Robert Sahr and Patrick O'Heffernan discuss mass media and U.S. foreign policy processes in two chapters, and Holli Semetko and Edie Goldenberg examine how AIDS reporters in several countries use the media to affect policymaking.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Defining the Media-Policy Link
Theoretical Perspectives Media Impact on the Political Status Quo--What is the Evidence?
Newsmaking and Policymaking: Steps Toward a Dialogue
Media and Domestic Policy Impact of Commissioner Background on FCC Decisions, 1975-1990
Bringing the Distant Close: Learning About South Africa From the News
The Media, Economic Development, and Agenda Setting
The Media, the Right to Privacy and Judicial Policy-Making: Rethinking Conceptual Foundations
Media Images as Environmental Policy
The Advertising Driven "New" Mass Media Election and the Rhetoric of Policy Issues: The 1990 Gantt-Helms Senate Race
Media and Comparative-Foreign Policy Dimensions Credentialing Experts: The Climate of Opinion and Journalist Selection of Sources in Domestic and Foreign Policy
AIDS Reporting in the United States and Britain: What Reporters Know and What They Think the Public Knows
Mass Media and U.S. Foreign Policy: A Mutual Exploitation Model of Media Influence in U.S. Foreign Policy
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem