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1898 : prelude to a century /
John A. Corry.
imprint
New York : J.A. Corry ; Bronx, N.Y. : Distributed by Fordham University Press, 1998.
description
374 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0966157001
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : J.A. Corry ; Bronx, N.Y. : Distributed by Fordham University Press, 1998.
isbn
0966157001
catalogue key
2992633
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 360-366) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1998-05-01:
The year 1898 stands out as one pivotal to American history and, to a lesser extent, world history. Each of these books by two independent scholars emphasizes the ways in which that year's events set the stage for the 20th century. Corry's overview of domestic and international politics draws clear connections between European imperial rivalries and the Spanish-American War but merely glances at equally important events in Asia that do not quite fit into the chronological framework. George Dewey's triumph at Manila Bay was part of a larger American push across the Pacific toward Asia: the events of 1898 had global ramifications. Culling stories, testimony, and documents from a wide range of printed sources and existing studies, Corry's narrative occasionally takes on the appearance of a scrapbook but offers a useful point of departure. Somewhat more engrossing is Traxel's lively account of American society and politics during these same 12 months. The Spanish-American War and its heroes, including Teddy Roosevelt, take center stage, but Traxel offers an insightful glimpse into the making of modern America, complete with the growth of large corporations, advancements in technology, and labor strife. Those taking a bow include Admiral Peary, Clara Barton, W.E.B. DuBois, and Geronimo. Traxel leaves the reader to draw comparisons with today's end-of-century challenges and dilemmas, suggesting that 100 years may not be all that long ago. In any case, there is more than the Maine for us to remember about the year that, Traxel claims, gave birth to the American century.‘Brooks D. Simpson, Arizona State Univ., Tempe (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Written with a vigorous narrative style and an eye for the apt quotation and telling detail. I am reading it with great pleasure."
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The twentieth century is often referred to as "The American Century". In this new book, John A. Corry examines how the year 1898 was the watershed that set the scene for the century that would follow. It was 1898, in a decisive victory in a war with Spain lasting less than four months, that the United States acquired territories in the Caribbean and Pacific, marking its fast major step toward becoming a world power. Other important events led to rivalries and alliances that determined theoutcome of the First World War.
Main Description
The twentieth century is often referred to as "The American Century". In this new book, John A. Corry examines how the year 1898 was the watershed that set the scene for the century that would follow. It was 1898, in a decisive victory in a war with Spain lasting less than four months, thatthe United States acquired territories in the Caribbean and Pacific, marking its fast major step toward becoming a world power. Other important events led to rivalries and alliances that determined the outcome of the First World War.
Main Description
The twentieth century is often referred to as "The American Century". In this new book, John A. Corry examines how the year 1898 was the watershed that set the scene for the century that would follow. It was 1898, in a decisive victory in a war with Spain lasting less than four months, that the United States acquired territories in the Caribbean and Pacific, marking its fast major step toward becoming a world power. Other important events led to rivalries and alliances that determined the outcome of the First World War.
Unpaid Annotation
1898 was the year in which the United States first became a world power. In a decisive victory in a war with Spain lasting less than four months, it acquired territories in the Caribbean and Pacific, and positioned itself so that the Twentieth Century became to many "The American Century". This was not the only way that 1898 set the course for the next hundred years. The year also saw the first flowering of the "special relationship" between the United States and Great Britain that so significantly influenced the next century. By contrast, the mecurial Kaiser William II's decision to expand the German navy together with Germany's rejection of an English effort to foster better relations set the two countries on a collision course that eventually led to war. Meanwhile the resolution of a dramatic confrontation between England and France in the southern Sudan led the two countries to end their long-standing colonial rivalry and later join as allies in two World Wars. Finally, the turmoil created byFrance's Dreyfus Affair evidenced the strong anti-Semitism in supposedly enlightened Western Europe that foreshadowed the Holocaust. It tells the story of the larger-than-life Theodore Roosevelt as he put the American navy on a war footing, led his Rough Riders up San Juan Hill, and waged a tumultuous "whistle stop" campaign to win election as New York's Governor. Other memorable characters include the cautious President William McKinley, whom events transformed into a committed imperialist, the ambitious twenty-three-year-old Winston Churchill, who emerged for the first time as a public figure, novelist Emile Zola, who exiled himself from France to escape imprisonment for his accusations inthe Dreyfus case, and the intrepid Captain Jean-Baptiste Marchand, who led a small French contingent through more than three thousand miles of African wilderness only to be ordered home from his post on the Upper Nile.
Unpaid Annotation
ôWritten with a vigorous narrative style and an eye for the apt quotation and telling detail. I am reading it with great pleasure.ö -James M. McPherson

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