Catalogue


I ain't got time to bleed : reworking the body politic from the bottom up /
Jesse Ventura.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Villard, c1999.
description
208 p. : ill.
ISBN
0375503323
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Villard, c1999.
isbn
0375503323
catalogue key
2978263
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jesse Ventura, the governor of Minnesota, lives with his wife and their teenage son and daughter in St. Paul.
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
Our final big push came seventy-two hours before the election. We rented some RVs, set up a live Internet feed, and headed out on a thirty-four-stop trip around the state, straight through, no sleep. But I knew from my background that I could do it-it was less than half of Hell Week! As those all-important last hours ticked down, we stole all the thunder from the other two campaigns. The press jumped on board with us, because we were having all the fun. We invited people, "Come along! Jump in your cars and come with us for as long as you want to go!" We had times when we were going down the highway with twenty-five cars tooting their horns, waving banners and flags. We came into cities in a whirlwind of noise. Later, people rushed home and jumped on the Internet to see if they could see pictures of themselves. There was running commentary, "Jesse's now left for Hutchinson. . . ." We literally stole all the publicity and all the momentum that weekend. That's when I started to believe we had a shot at winning. I always knew we had an outside chance, but that's the first time the possibility really began to seem real to me. Even Terry started to feel it. She went on the seventy-two-hour blitz with us. It was her first real involvement in the campaign. I had told her from the start that I didn't expect her to be part of it unless she wanted to be. She could be as little or as much involved as she liked. It was during that blitz that my confrontation with Hillary Clinton took place. It was on Saturday-I think we were in Rochester that morning-that Hillary had come into town to stump for Humphrey. One of the press guys came up to me and said, "Did you hear what Hillary Clinton said about you? She said it's time to end the carnival sideshow act that's going on here and get down to the business of electing Skip Humphrey. How do you feel about Hillary Clinton calling you a carnival sideshow act?" I said, "It seems to me, rather than being concerned about Minnesota politics, Hillary should be more concerned about leaving Bill home alone. He seems to get into a lot of mischief whenever she leaves him." You wanna start the fight, the Klingon's gonna draw the line in the sand. Strike us, and you make us stronger.
First Chapter
Our final big push came seventy-two hours before the election. We rented some RVs, set up a live Internet feed, and headed out on a thirty-four-stop trip around the state, straight through, no sleep. But I knew from my background that I could do it-it was less than half of Hell Week!

As those all-important last hours ticked down, we stole all the thunder from the other two campaigns. The press jumped on board with us, because we were having all the fun. We invited people, "Come along! Jump in your cars and come with us for as long as you want to go!" We had times when we were going down the highway with twenty-five cars tooting their horns, waving banners and flags. We came into cities in a whirlwind of noise. Later, people rushed home and jumped on the Internet to see if they could see pictures of themselves. There was running commentary, "Jesse's now left for Hutchinson. . . ." We literally stole all the publicity and all the momentum that weekend. That's when I started to believe we had a shot at winning. I always knew we had an outside chance, but that's the first time the possibility really began to seem real to me.

Even Terry started to feel it. She went on the seventy-two-hour blitz with us. It was her first real involvement in the campaign. I had told her from the start that I didn't expect her to be part of it unless she wanted to be. She could be as little or as much involved as she liked.

It was during that blitz that my confrontation with Hillary Clinton took place. It was on Saturday-I think we were in Rochester that morning-that Hillary had come into town to stump for Humphrey. One of the press guys came up to me and said, "Did you hear what Hillary Clinton said about you? She said it's time to end the carnival sideshow act that's going on here and get down to the business of electing Skip Humphrey. How do you feel about Hillary Clinton calling you a carnival sideshow act?"

I said, "It seems to me, rather than being concerned about Minnesota politics, Hillary should be more concerned about leaving Bill home alone. He seems to get into a lot of mischief whenever she leaves him." You wanna start the fight, the Klingon's gonna draw the line in the sand. Strike us, and you make us stronger.
Excerpted from I Ain't Got Time to Bleed: Reworking the Body Politic from the Bottom Up by Jesse Ventura
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2000-01-01:
The packaging for this audio describes it as half "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." Mr. Smith wanted to channel federal dollars to fund a visionary national boys camp; Ventura wants to take funds away from government programs to give tax cuts to individuals. This three-hour whining session contains not one other shred of real policy--just complaints about unfair government practices. It's the sad story of a frat house-style rebellion on Minnesota campuses that reeled horribly out of control and for which now the people of that state must suffer through the inane antics and ignorant thought processes of Ventura for the next few years. The hardest part is the governor's gloating about how the election was the result of his "plan," and how (who knows?) the next stop may be the presidency of the United States. Definitely not recommended.--Mark Pumphrey, Polk Cty. P.L., Columbus, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1999-05-31:
Minnesota governor Jesse Ventura describes his politics and his life with a simplicity that his supporters will cheer as fist-shaking bolts of truth and that his detractors will pan as loud, flippant and glib. The text first outlines Ventura's political platform ("less government is more" just about sums it up), then tracks his life through roles as blue-collar bad boy, Navy Seal, pro wrestler, wrestling commentator, film star, mayor, talk-radio host and, finally, campaigner and governor. Ventura likes to play the angry man in the bar complaining about the bums in office. Like most Reform Party candidates, he doesn't believe government can do much anyway. Eighty percent of the book is autobiography, a series of American success stories about the man who doesn't believe in the word can't. His ego appears to play such a large role in his persona that even his claim that he doesn't want to be called upon to be president exudes a scent of sham modesty. Ventura fan or not, any reader can appreciate the story of this man's desire to unseat "the old boy network" and engage the people. But the chapters on his entertainment years, and Ventura's incessant name-dropping, ultimately undermine his premiseÄthat he isn't a politician, just a private-sector Joe. At times, Ventura is so entertaining that readers might forget, temporarily, that he's a celebrity politician employing the advantage of his fame. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, May 1999
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Summaries
Main Description
When he left the navy SEALs to become a pro wrestler, the fans knew him as "Jesse, the Body." When he hosted his hard-hitting KFAN radio talk show, he became "Jesse, the Mouth." And now that this body-slamming, straight-talking, charismatic hero is masterminding Minnesota's gubernatorial decisions, you'd better start calling him "Jesse, the Mind." InI Ain't Got Time to Bleed, Jesse Ventura reveals the secret of his landslide electoral successwith record voter turnoutand maps his innovative strategies for pioneering a new era in American government. In his own inimitable words, he takes on bloated government, career politicians, and apathetic voters, and tells the wildly colorful story of his days as a navy SEAL, his nights in the pro-wrestling ring, and his experiences on radio and in films likePredatorandBatman and Robin. I Ain't Got Time to BleedisRockymeetsMr. Smith Goes to Washingtona book that will challenge readers' ideas of traditional government as it introduces them to one of American politics' most ferocious new heroes.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. VII
The American Dreamp. 3
Sound Body, Sound Mindp. 12
How it all Startedp. 39
Navy Sealsp. 56
"The Body"p. 84
"The Mouth"p. 112
"The Mind"p. 137
Accepting the Shacklesp. 178
Self-Reliancep. 193
Looking Nationalp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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