Catalogue


Threads of solidarity : women in South African industry, 1900-1980 /
Iris Berger.
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press ; London : James Currey, c1992.
description
xi, 368 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0253207002 (Indiana University Press : pbk. : alk. paper) 0852550782 (James Currey) 0852550774 (James Currey : pbk.) 025331173X (Indiana University Press : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press ; London : James Currey, c1992.
isbn
0253207002 (Indiana University Press : pbk. : alk. paper) 0852550782 (James Currey) 0852550774 (James Currey : pbk.) 025331173X (Indiana University Press : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2963179
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [301]-357) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-12:
With its complex combination of capitalism, Christianity, Western-style education and values, including racism--if not apartheid--South Africa has, since the 1940s and 1950s, provided a rich arena for research. To this Berger has added the gender component as a category of thought and catalyst for political action, together with its impact on women in South Africa's work force and labor unions. Dealing with white (Afrikaans), coloured, and black women, Berger traces their changing wage-labor functions and shifting roles from the turn of the century to the 1980s. Using complex data derived primarily from the Garment Worker's Union of the Transvaal and the Food and Canning Workers' Union and its African counterpart, Berger favors the ^D" situating women in the combined context of work, family, culture, and community, as opposed exclusively to work-related phenomena. Demonstrating the increase of women in the work force, Berger shows the transformation from dependency and domesticity at the turn of the century, through the 1920s and '30s. By the 1940s and 1950s, wartime conditions combined with the exigencies of the apartheid state had transformed the structure of female wage-labor, bringing a flood of black women onto the industrial and domestic servant labor market. Events of the 1960s, '70s, and '80s culminated in repression and resistance. Berger shows that women were more inclined to become active union members when their participation could be centered around work-based and/or community-based culture and networks, or where unions had incorporated womens' concerns and informal community ties. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty; professional. B. M. Perinbam University of Maryland at College Park
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1992
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Summaries
Main Description
"... enables us to deepen our understanding of the organization of working women." -- International Journal of African Historical Studies "... an impressive piece of scholarship." -- American Journal of Sociology Virtually ignored by labor historians are the black and white women in South African industries. Drawing on comparative labor history and feminist theory, this important study traces the history of women as industrial workers and trade unionists in South Africa during most of the twentieth century.
Main Description
"... enables us to deepen our understanding of the organization of working women."  -- International Journal of African Historical Studies"... an impressive piece of scholarship." -- American Journal of SociologyVirtually ignored by labor historians are the black and white women in South African industries. Drawing on comparative labor history and feminist theory, this important study traces the history of women as industrial workers and trade unionists in South Africa during most of the twentieth century.
Main Description
"... enables us to deepen our understanding of the organization of working women."International Journal of African Historical Studies "... an impressive piece of scholarship." American Journal of Sociology Virtually ignored by labor historians are the black and white women in South African industries. Drawing on comparative labor history and feminist theory, this important study traces the history of women as industrial workers and trade unionists in South Africa during most of the twentieth century.
Table of Contents
Preface
Abbreviations
Gender and Industrialization
Gender, Community, and Working-Class Historyp. 3
Dependency and Domesticity: Women's Wage Labor, 1900-1925p. 16
Women in the New Industrial Unions
Patterns of Women's Labor, 1925-1940p. 47
Daughters of the Depressionp. 70
Commandos of Working Womenp. 90
A Lengthening Threadp. 105
A New Working Class and the Challenge of Diversity
Nimble Fingers and Keen Eyesight: Women in Wartime Productionp. 131
A New Working Class, 1940-1960p. 153
Solidarity Fragmented: Garment Workers in the Transvaalp. 170
Food and Canning Workers at the Cape: The Structure of Gender and Racep. 190
Standing Unitedp. 204
Never Far from Home: Family, Community, and Working Womenp. 222
Decentralization and the Rise of Independent Unions
City and Periphery, 1960-1980p. 249
Repression and Resistancep. 264
Epilogue: Common Threads, Past and Presentp. 291
Notesp. 301
Documentary Sources and Interviewsp. 356
Indexp. 359
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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