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Foreign temporary workers in America : policies that benefit the U.S. economy /
edited by B. Lindsay Lowell.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Quorum, 1999.
description
vi, 285 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1567202276 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Quorum, 1999.
isbn
1567202276 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2962398
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-10-01:
Essays in this volume were solicited by the US Commission on Immigration Reform, and the final chapter of the book summarizes the Commission's recommendations to Congress. Chapters assess, from various perspectives, US policy on the admission of "nonimmigrant" workers to the country. Such "limited duration admissions," or LDAs, are administered through a complex system of regulation by several different federal agencies. The book is organized into three sections: one deals with the system as a whole; one deals mostly with specific groups of LDAs (highly skilled specialty workers in information technology, biotechnology, and university-based scientific research, as well as agricultural workers); and one focuses on students. Contributors generally agree that an optimal policy must balance the needs of employers for certain workers with the interests of American workers for protection against unfair competition, but there are also variations in their views as to how the balance can best be reached. Contributors are experts of LDA policy as it affects temporary workers, and they sometimes seem to assume reader familiarity with the evidence on which their policy recommendations are based, rather than explicating that evidence. Most appropriate for comprehensive labor collections supporting graduate and research programs. H. G. Foster SUNY at Buffalo
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1999
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The number of temporary workers residing legally in the USA has grown dramatically over the last 30 years. The contributors to this volume explore the impact these people are having on the labour market.
Long Description
Legal admission to the United States is primarily for the purpose of permanent residence or temporary stay. Whereas the number of permanent admissions is only now reaching the levels from the turn of the last century, the total number of temporary admissions today--about 25 million--is about 200 times greater than a century ago. The global economy sends tens of thousands of businessmen and intracompany transferees from Japan and other trading partners to our shores. It sends foreign students to American's preeminent institutions of higher learning. And it supplies specially skilled workers to high-tech employers and unskilled workers to labor in our fields. The numbers of temporary migrants are unprecedented, yet to date there has been little systematic analysis of their impact. The research brought together in this volume suggests that the overall impact of temporary workers and foreign students is positive. Yet, there are points of friction such as in some institutions of higher learning where foreign postdoctoral students and instructors comprise large proportions of those teaching the sciences and engineering. In high technology research and computer programming, some foreign workers are found in "job shops" that exploit the foreign worker and underbid competitors on special contracts. The authors suggest policy changes that would combat undesirable outcomes and manage temporary labor in a more productive fashion. In doing so, Lowell and the contributors to this volume break new ground and provide readers with the first book-length study and analysis devoted exclusively to foreign temporary workers in the United States. Their book will be an important source of data and ideas for human resource executives, upper management, and policy decision makers thorougout the public sector.
Long Description
Legal admission to the United States is primarily for the purpose of permanent residence or temporary stay. Whereas the number of permanent admissions is only now reaching the levels from the turn of the last century, the total number of temporary admissions todayabout 25 millionis about 200 times greater than a century ago. The global economy sends tens of thousands of businessmen and intracompany transferees from Japan and other trading partners to our shores. It sends foreign students to American's preeminent institutions of higher learning. And it supplies specially skilled workers to high-tech employers and unskilled workers to labor in our fields. The numbers of temporary migrants are unprecedented, yet to date there has been little systematic analysis of their impact. The research brought together in this volume suggests that the overall impact of temporary workers and foreign students is positive. Yet, there are points of friction such as in some institutions of higher learning where foreign postdoctoral students and instructors comprise large proportions of those teaching the sciences and engineering. In high technology research and computer programming, some foreign workers are found in job shops that exploit the foreign worker and underbid competitors on special contracts. The authors suggest policy changes that would combat undesirable outcomes and manage temporary labor in a more productive fashion. In doing so, Lowell and the contributors to this volume break new ground and provide readers with the first book-length study and analysis devoted exclusively to foreign temporary workers in the United States. Their book will be an important source of data and ideas for human resource executives, upper management, and policy decision makers thorougout the public sector.
Table of Contents
Preface
Temporary Visas for Work
Study and Cultural Exchange: Introduction and Summary System Overview Skilled Temporary Workers in the Global Economy: Creating a Balanced and Forward-looking Selection Process
Some Thoughts on Nonimmigrant Student and Worker Programs
Policy of the United States
Workers The New High-Tech braceros?: Who is the Employer? What is the Problem?
Skill Level and Employer Use of Foreign Specialty Workers
Nonimmigrant Visa Programs: Problems and Policy Reforms
California's Farm Labor Market and Immigration Reform
Students Policy Analysis of Foreign Student Visas
Denial of Doctoral Opportunites for African Americans
Sr. An Alien Invasion or Brain Gain?
Limited Duration Admissions
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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