Catalogue


Soviet security and intelligence organizations, 1917-1990: a biographical dictionary and review of literature in English /
Michael Parrish ; with a foreword by Robert Conquest.
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1992.
description
xxv, 669 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0313283052 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-06:
Despite the collapse of the USSR, the Soviet security apparatus and its leaders remain a mystery. A large body of literature on the operations of the KGB, GRU, and other organizations exists in the West, but few reference sources aid students and scholars in identifyng the most useful and relevant works or finding information on the officials involved. Several bibliographies concerning intelligence and espionage appeared in the early 1980s; none focuses specifically on the USSR. Biographies of police and intelligence officials are frequently available only through often unreliable Soviet sources. In this biobibliography, Sovietologist Michael Parrish attempts to remedy these deficiencies. The result is both impressive and frustrating. The organization is straightforward. A biographical section, the largest in the book, provides brief entries on 4,000 senior and mid-level officials holding positions in one or more of the security services from 1917 to 1990. The length and completeness for each varies with the importance of the subject and the amount of information available. A smaller section contains an annotated list of English-language books about Soviet police and intelligence agencies. Parrish (Indiana University) provides critical annotations for those works he regards as significant. He does not list periodical articles. This source has limits growing out of continuing restrictions on access to relevant Soviet archives. If nothing else, however, Parrish gives those interested in the history of Soviet police and intelligence operations a starting point for research particularly for biographies. Recommended for academic libraries supporting Russian studies programs.-W. F. Bell, University of North Texas
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Despite the collapse of the USSR, the Soviet security apparatus and its leaders remain a mystery. Several bibliographies concerning intelligence and espionage appeared in the early 1980s; none focuses specifically on the USSR. Biographies of police and intelligence officials are frequently available only through often unreliable Soviet sources. In this biobibliography, Sovietologist Michael Parrish attempts to remedy these deficiencies. The result is both impressive and frustrating. The organization is straightforward. A biographical section, the largest in the book, provides brief entries on 4,000 senior and mid-level officials holding positions in one or more of the security services from 1917 to 1990. The length and completeness for each varies with the importance of the subject and the amount of information available. A smaller section contains an annotated list of English-language books about Soviet police and intelligence agencies. Parrish (Indiana University) provides critical d100 for those works he regards as significant. However, Parrish gives those interested in the history of Soviet police and intelligence operations a starting point for research--particularly for biographies."- Choice
"This timely work should stimulate further research on the organizations foundational to the Soviet state and their undetermined role in the Soviet Union's successor entities."- ARBA
'œThis timely work should stimulate further research on the organizations foundational to the Soviet state and their undetermined role in the Soviet Union's successor entities.'' ARBA
'œDespite the collapse of the USSR, the Soviet security apparatus and its leaders remain a mystery. Several bibliographies concerning intelligence and espionage appeared in the early 1980s; none focuses specifically on the USSR. Biographies of police and intelligence officials are frequently available only through often unreliable Soviet sources. In this biobibliography, Sovietologist Michael Parrish attempts to remedy these deficiencies. The result is both impressive and frustrating. The organization is straightforward. A biographical section, the largest in the book, provides brief entries on 4,000 senior and mid-level officials holding positions in one or more of the security services from 1917 to 1990. The length and completeness for each varies with the importance of the subject and the amount of information available. A smaller section contains an annotated list of English-language books about Soviet police and intelligence agencies. Parrish (Indiana University) provides critical annotation for those works he regards as significant. However, Parrish gives those interested in the history of Soviet police and intelligence operations a starting point for research--particularly for biographies.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1992
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Summaries
Long Description
One of the hallmarks of the Soviet system was its heavy reliance on internal and foreign security and intelligence organizations. Not surprisingly, given the secrecy surrounding Soviet efforts in these areas, no biographical reference tools and few bibliographies have been published to date. In this context, Michael Parrish's work is a unique undertaking. In the first section to the volume, biographies are provided on some 4,000 officials in senior and mid-level positions who had served in Cheka, NKVD/RFSFR, GPU, KGB, and other organizations. Also included are officials of the Committee for State Control (formerly Ministry of State Control, and, before that, Commissariat of Workers and Peasants' Inspection). Prominent political personalities with earlier ties to security services, such as N.A. Bulganin, are listed even though such service formed only a brief part of their careers. Others listed include party officials, such as A.A. Kuznetsov, who at different times served as the Party's watchdog of security organs. Also included, because of their close association with repression and security organs, are members of Stalin's inner circle. The second part of the volume is a survey of books in English published between 1917 and 1990 which related to Soviet security and intelligence organizations. This is followed by a biographical addendum, a glossary of terms, and material showing the development of Soviet security organizations. No one concerned with current intelligence issues and the role of security organizations in Soviet life can ignore this volume.
Table of Contents
Foreword Robert Conquest Biographical Dictionary Literature in English
Appendices
Selected Glossary of Abbreviations
Reference
Sources Development and Leadership of Soviet Security Organs 1917-1990
Biographical Dictionary Addendum
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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