Catalogue


The man who was Thursday : a nightmare /
by G.K. Chesterton.
edition
Dover ed. --
imprint
New York : Dover, 1986.
description
120 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0486251217 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Dover, 1986.
isbn
0486251217 (pbk.)
general note
Reprint. Originally published: New York : Dodd, Mead, 1908.
catalogue key
2948025
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Boston Globe, September 2005
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Summaries
Main Description
Delicious, witty, fast-paced novel about a club of anarchists in turn-of-the-century London and a poet/sleuth who infiltrates their ranks. Inventive and ingenious story becomes a vehicle for Chesterton's brilliant social, religious and philosophical speculations.
Main Description
Delicious, witty, fast-paced novel about a club of anarchists in turn-of-the-century London and a poet/sleuth who infiltrates their ranks. Inventive and ingenious story becomes a vehicle for Chesterton's brilliant social, religious, and philosophical speculations.
Main Description
Perhaps best-known for his "Father Brown" detective series, G. K. Chesterton was renowned for his wit, rhetorical brilliance, and talent for ingenious paradox. Those qualities fill this funny, fast-paced novel about a club of anarchists in turn-of-the-20th-century London. Ostensibly a story of mystery and espionage, it's also functions as a vehicle for social, religious, and philosophical commentary.
Unpaid Annotation
Widely considered as Chesterton's masterpiece, The Man Who Was Thursday (1908) defies classification. Subtitled 'A nightmare' by Chesterton, on one level it is a fast-moving and surreal detective story. Drawing on contemporary fears of anarchist conspiracies and bomb outrages, The Man Who Was Thursday is firmly rooted in its time and place - turn-of-the-century London - but it also defies temporal boundaries. Police Detective Syme finds himself drawn into a world that seems to have gone beyond humanity when he is elected 'Thursday', one of the members of the Central European Council of seven monarchs. Dreamlike, prophetic, and frequently funny, the novel attacks contemporary pessimism and, through a bizarre series of pursuits and unmaskings, returns Syme - and us - to earth more aware of its beauty, promise, and creative potential.

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