Catalogue

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The abolitionist legacy : from Reconstruction to the NAACP /
James M. McPherson.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, [1975]
description
xiii, 438 p. : graphs ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0691046379
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, [1975]
isbn
0691046379
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
2939441
 
Bibliography: p. 417-422.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1995-10-15:
These volumes, published in 1975 and 1964, respectively, chronicle the abolitionist movement from before the Civil War to the part it played in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. LJ's reviewer found The Abolitionist Legacy an "ably researched, well-written book" (LJ 12/15/75). (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In addition to discussing the complex blend of egalitarianism and paternalism in the thought of white proponents of black advancement, McPherson offers suggestions of the intricate mixture of racial consciousness, individual ambition, and racial romanticism that continues to fuel modern black separatism."-- Political Science Quarterly
"Must surely be assigned an important place in the literature of the history of ideas and of race relations in the United States."-- The Times Literary Supplement
" The Abolitionist Legacy shows many of the same graces as its predecessor: wide-ranging and careful research, a strong sense of story line, an eye for good quotations, unyielding sympathy for those who devoted their lives to uplifting the freedmen."-- Reviews in American History
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Building on arguments presented in "The Struggle for Equality," James McPherson shows that many abolitionists did not retreat from Reconstruction, as historical accounts frequently lead us to believe, but instead vigorously continued the battle for black rights long after the Civil War. Tracing the activities of nearly 300 abolitionists and their descendants, he reveals that some played a crucial role in the establishment of schools and colleges for southern blacks, while others formed the vanguard of liberals who founded the NAACP in 1910. The author's examination of the complex and unhappy fate of Reconstruction clarifies the uneasy partnership of northern and southern white liberals after 1870, the tensions between black activists and white neo-abolitionists, the evolution of resistance to racist ideologies, and the origins of the NAACP.
Main Description
Building on arguments presented in The Struggle for Equality , James McPherson shows that many abolitionists did not retreat from Reconstruction, as historical accounts frequently lead us to believe, but instead vigorously continued the battle for black rights long after the Civil War. Tracing the activities of nearly 300 abolitionists and their descendants, he reveals that some played a crucial role in the establishment of schools and colleges for southern blacks, while others formed the vanguard of liberals who founded the NAACP in 1910. The author's examination of the complex and unhappy fate of Reconstruction clarifies the uneasy partnership of northern and southern white liberals after 1870, the tensions between black activists and white neo-abolitionists, the evolution of resistance to racist ideologies, and the origins of the NAACP.
Table of Contents
Preface to the 1995 Edition
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introductionp. 3
Unfinished Task: The Civil Rights Act of 1875p. 13
Reconstruction Reconfirmed? The Election of 1872p. 24
Reconstruction Unravels, 1873-1876p. 35
Time, Education, and Bootstrapsp. 53
The Compromise of 1877p. 81
Crosscurrents and Confusion, 1877-1880p. 95
The New Southp. 107
Good-bye to the Bloody Shirtp. 121
The Roots of Freedmen's Educationp. 143
Between Black and White: Puritans in Babylonp. 161
Paternalism and Pietyp. 184
Detour or Mainstream? The Curriculum of Missionary Schoolsp. 203
The Segregation Issuep. 224
Berea Collegep. 244
The Struggle for Black Controlp. 262
The Shattering of Hopep. 299
Women's Rights and Anti-Imperialismp. 318
History and Biologyp. 333
Booker T. Washington and the Reaffirmation of Gradualismp. 354
The Rejection of Gradualism and the Founding of the NAACPp. 368
Abolitionists on Whom This Book is Basedp. 395
Southern Negro Colleges and Secondary Schools Established by Northern Mission Societiesp. 409
A Note on Sourcesp. 417
Indexp. 423
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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