Catalogue


Abraham Lincoln, the orator : penetrating the Lincoln legend /
Lois J. Einhorn.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1992.
description
xx, 225 p. : ill. --
ISBN
0313261687 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1992.
isbn
0313261687 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2936987
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-02:
Einhorn follows the prescribed series format: a critical analysis of the orator and the orator's speeches with a focus on the speaker, speech, occasion, and effect; the texts of nine important speeches discussed in the critical analysis; and bibliographical materials. Einhorn collected "bits and pieces" of Lincoln's ideas about the art of rhetoric from speeches, conversations, letters, and other written messages. Unfortunately, Lincoln had little to say. Einhorn found that Lincoln did follow his own advice and used logical argument, detailed documentation, factual accuracy, and frequent allusions to the theater and the Bible. Einhorn effectively demonstrates that Lincoln's speeches changed from an oral to a written style as he moved from stump speaker to president. However, she conservatively presents Lincoln's use of humor, usually considered an important element in the Lincoln legend. Einhorn examines in detail Lincoln's "First Inaugural Address," his speeches and views on slavery and racial equality, and the "Gettysburg Address." Aware that Lincoln usually edited his speeches before publication, the author attempted to verify "every word and punctuation mark" of what Lincoln actually said, and she consulted hundreds of sources. Einhorn has added little to the knowledge of Lincoln's rhetorical skills; the book fails at "penetrating the Lincoln legend." R. L. Fischer; University of North Dakota
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œ. . . Contained therein are sound arguments and original thinking, too. Einhorn has made a welcome contribution to the field, and I suspect that most Lincoln students will--and should--add it to their libraries.'' Bluer Gray Magazine
". . . Contained therein are sound arguments and original thinking, too. Einhorn has made a welcome contribution to the field, and I suspect that most Lincoln students will--and should--add it to their libraries."- Bluer Gray Magazine
'œEinhorn . . . has masterfully analyzed Lincoln's speeches to reveal the complexities and brilliance of the sixteenth president. . . . A faascinating look at a most complex man. Speech and the use of language was an integral part of Abraham Lincoln, and this book should read by anyone who is interested in him.'' The Courier
"Einhorn . . . has masterfully analyzed Lincoln's speeches to reveal the complexities and brilliance of the sixteenth president. . . . A faascinating look at a most complex man. Speech and the use of language was an integral part of Abraham Lincoln, and this book should read by anyone who is interested in him."- The Courier
'œLois J. Einhorn, has masterfully analyzed Lincoln's speeches to reveal the complexities and brilliance of the sixteenth president. . . . a fascinating look at a most complex man. Speech and the use of language was an integral part of Abraham Lincoln, and this book should be read by anyone who is interested in him.'' The Courier
"Lois J. Einhorn, has masterfully analyzed Lincoln's speeches to reveal the complexities and brilliance of the sixteenth president. . . . a fascinating look at a most complex man. Speech and the use of language was an integral part of Abraham Lincoln, and this book should be read by anyone who is interested in him."- The Courier
'œProfessor Einhorn has written a fine volume with an outstanding literary style. This tome will prove to be most valuable to students of Lincolniana, as well as those in the fields of rhetoric, speech, communications. . . . recommends that libraries and scholars immediately obtain the volume for their collections. It will indeed be a joy to read for both entertainment and research. Much thought has gone into its writing.'' Lincoln Herald
"Professor Einhorn has written a fine volume with an outstanding literary style. This tome will prove to be most valuable to students of Lincolniana, as well as those in the fields of rhetoric, speech, communications. . . . recommends that libraries and scholars immediately obtain the volume for their collections. It will indeed be a joy to read for both entertainment and research. Much thought has gone into its writing."- Lincoln Herald
'œThis beautifully crafted book is the sixteenth volume in a series on Great American Orators. . . . There are many points of intetest in this slim but well-written volume, such as Lincoln's use of humor and ridicule as rhetorical devices; his evolving rhetorical stances on slavery, race, and amancipation; and how it was that North and South each heard very different messages in the "First Inaugural Address." Einhorn has written a book that will interest rhetoricians and historians, as well as all those many others who simply enjoy reading about our Sixteenth President.'' Civil War History
"This beautifully crafted book is the sixteenth volume in a series on Great American Orators. . . . There are many points of intetest in this slim but well-written volume, such as Lincoln's use of humor and ridicule as rhetorical devices; his evolving rhetorical stances on slavery, race, and amancipation; and how it was that North and South each heard very different messages in the "First Inaugural Address." Einhorn has written a book that will interest rhetoricians and historians, as well as all those many others who simply enjoy reading about our Sixteenth President."- Civil War History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Although much has been written about Abraham Lincoln, there has been little rhetorical analysis of how he communicated with his public. By studying Lincoln's rhetoric closely, we can gain real insights into Lincoln as an orator, debater, jester, lawyer, statesman, leader, and president. This critical appraisal of his public speaking is linked to transcripts of some major speeches and to a chronology, bibliography, and an index.
Long Description
Although much has been written about Abraham Lincoln, there has been little rhetorical analysis of how this public man communicated with his listeners. Yet by studying his rhetoric closely, we can gain real insights into Lincoln as an orator, debater, jester, lawyer, statesman, leader, and president. This critical appraisal of his public speaking is linked to transcripts of some major speeches and to a chronology, bibliography, and an index. This useful one-volume reference is intended for students, scholars, and experts in communications and rhetoric, political science, and American studies and history. Lois J. Einhorn presents a rhetorical analysis of Abraham Lincoln's speaking, defining his view toward public speaking, characteristics of his rhetoric, his use of humor, and the development of his various addresses while president. Texts of nine selected speeches are printed exactly. A short chronology of speeches, a selected bibliography of Lincoln as a speaker, and a general index complete this important new reference work.
Table of Contents
Illustrations
Series
Foreword
A Rhetorical Analysis of Abraham Lincoln's Speaking
Introduction
Lincoln Speaks about Speaking Did Lincoln Practice What He Preached?
Characteristics and Development of Lincoln's Speaking No Laughing Matter
Lincoln's Use of Humor as a Rhetorical Device Lincoln's First Inaugural
Peace and Sword Evolving Rhetorical Stances on Emancipation Lincoln's Gettysburg Address
Immediate Failure and Lasting Success
Conclusion: The Making of a Legend Lincoln Speaks Out
Texts of Selected Speeches "Lyceum Address"
"Temperance Address"
"House Divided Speech"
"Second Lecture on Discoveries and Inventions"
"Cooper Union Address"
"Farewell to Springfield"
"First Inaugural Address"
"Gettysburg Address"
"Second Inaugural Address"
Notes
Chronology of Major Speeches
History in Motion
Selected Bibliography on Lincoln
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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