Catalogue


Stress : the nature and history of engineered grief /
Robert Kugelmann.
imprint
New York : Praeger, 1992.
description
xvii, 203 p.
ISBN
0275942716 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Praeger, 1992.
isbn
0275942716 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2926152
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-05:
Kugelmann explores the nature of stress, drawing from existentialism, phenomenology, and scientific and popular works on stress. His first two chapters explore the experience and impact of stress, and he concludes that stress as we know it today is the engineering of grief in adapting to the changes of the modern world. He discusses the losses that are the focus of that grief, and traces the origin and "construction" of stress backwards in history using WW II, WW I, the Industrial Revolution, and the material, medical, and social changes of the late 18th century as major milestones. The final chapter of the book raises questions about today's methods of "coping" with stress and about the future. The text is scholarly, extensively footnoted, and includes a 15-page bibliography. Some background in psychology, stress theories, and the social sciences will be useful in reading the text. There are no graphs, figures, or tables. Graduate; research; professional. M. Auterman; Augustana College (SD)
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œThe book is highly recommended to anyone concerned with how we can best respond to our stressful lives.'' Readings
'œThe text is scholarly, extensively footnoted, and includes a 15-page bibliography.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This book includes a phenomenology of the experience of stress, a history of the construction of "engineered grief," and an assessment of stress management programs.
Long Description
Stress names a kind of grief unique to the modern period, a grief perpetually unresolved, evoked by the rapid and relentless changes characteristic of modernity. Because our grief is always unresolved, the passion of mourning is perpetually productive. Stress is also a discourse, a mutation of experience by the external power of speech, a power that can devour what it articulates. Yet, it was not until World War II, when the psychiatric difficulties of pilots and bombers in particular brought stress into the open, that stress became a topic of medical and psychological research and a named cause of disorders. The term borrows the notions of pressure and tension from the engineering world. The seeds of stress are found around 1750, when the notion of luxury changed in meaning from a vice to be avoided to a virtue to be vigorously pursued. Before this time, human existence differed from ours in such a way that we detect no stress or anything like it. The book includes a phenomenology of the experience of stress, a history of the construction of engineered grief, and an assessment of stress management programs. Because such programs seek to make us comfortable with stress, they do not move us to bring the work of grieving to a resolution. This book will be of interest to post-modernists, phenomenologists, social constructionists, hermeneuticists, deconstructionists, social historians, and medical historians.
Long Description
"Stress" names a kind of grief unique to the modern period, a grief perpetually unresolved, evoked by the rapid and relentless changes characteristic of modernity. Because our grief is always unresolved, the passion of mourning is perpetually productive. Stress is also a discourse, a mutation of experience by the external power of speech, a power that can devour what it articulates. Yet, it was not until World War II, when the psychiatric difficulties of pilots and bombers in particular brought stress into the open, that stress became a topic of medical and psychological research and a named cause of disorders. The term borrows the notions of pressure and tension from the engineering world. The seeds of stress are found around 1750, when the notion of luxury changed in meaning from a vice to be avoided to a virtue to be vigorously pursued. Before this time, human existence differed from ours in such a way that we detect no stress or anything like it. The book includes a phenomenology of the experience of stress, a history of the construction of "engineered grief," and an assessment of stress management programs. Because such programs seek to make us comfortable with stress, they do not move us to bring the work of grieving to a resolution. This book will be of interest to post-modernists, phenomenologists, social constructionists, hermeneuticists, deconstructionists, social historians, and medical historians.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction Hurrying to Be
The Age of Stress The Engineering of Grief
The Martial Beginnings of Stress Preparing the Groundless
"This Strange Disease of Modern Life"
The Dangers of Strain Before Engineered Grief
The Two Ends of Engineered Grief
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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