Catalogue


The structure of a modern economy : the United States, 1929-89 /
Kenneth E. Boulding ; with the assistance of Meng Chi.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 1993.
description
xii, 215 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0814712037 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : New York University Press, 1993.
isbn
0814712037 :
catalogue key
292359
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 126-128) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-01:
Boulding provides a crisp overview of economic changes in the US between 1929 and 1989. He is struck by the extraordinary disturbances of the Great Depression, of WW II, and of the disarmament of 1945-47 and is surprised by the system's relative stability since the 1940s. He notes the unexpectedly small economic impact of the federal government, even during the New Deal, and the sharp erosion of profits by interest since 1950. He believes that the crowding out of profits by interest lowers productivity and employment. As always, Boulding pursues economic analysis through metaphor. He revisits the classical stagnation thesis, questioning the ability of an increasingly interdependent global system to sustain an acceptable living standard under the strain of constant and rapid population growth. An appendix contains extensive data. Boulding always sorts through data with his unique creative imagination. His economics is in a class by itself. The economics profession enjoyed a stroke of good fortune when economic questions captured the fancy of this extraordinary man. All levels. R. T. Averitt; Smith College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Morris L. Davis has made a major contribution to the literature in this examination of the denominational cultures that resulted in the racial segregation of the Central Jurisdiction of the Methodist Episcopal Church." - Choice
" The Methodist Unificationunderscores the immense power that race has held in American, and Methodist, consciousness, and its ability to shape the politics of both church and state." - Church History
( "Davis . . . brings to his study a sophisticated understanding of the nature of race, using his examination of the Methodist tradition to draw larger conclusions about the creation of a white Christian nationalism in early twentieth-century America. )-( The Journal of American History ),()
"Draws upon previously neglected primary sources to offer a ground-breaking analysis of the intertwined political, racial, and religious dynamics at work in the institutional merging of three American Methodist denominations in 1939. Davis boldly examines the conflicted ethics behind a dominant American religious culture's justification and preservation of racial segregation in the reformulation of its post-slavery institutional presence in American society. His work provides a much-needed, critical discussion of the racial issues that pervaded American religion and culture in the early twentieth century." - Wendy J. Deichmann Edwards, Academic Dean and Associate Professor of History and Theology, United Theological Seminary, Dayton Ohio
"A discerning, sober, and troubling probing of the preoccupation within the Methodist Church with Christian nationalism, civilization as defined by white Anglo-Saxon manhood, and race, race consciousness and 'the problem of the Negro' that was foundational to and constitutive of a reunited Methodism. A must read for students of early 20th century America." - Russell E. Richey, Emory University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1994
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In the early part of the twentieth century, Methodists were seen by many Americans as the most powerful Christian group in the country. Ulysses S. Grant is rumored to have said that during his presidency there were three major political parties in the U.S., if you counted the Methodists. The Methodist Unificationfocuses on the efforts among the Southern and Northern Methodist churches to create a unified national Methodist church, and how their plan for unification came to institutionalize racism and segregation in unprecedented ways. How did these Methodists conceive of what they had just formed as "united" when members in the church body were racially divided? Moving the history of racial segregation among Christians beyond a simplistic narrative of racism, Morris L. Davis shows that Methodists in the early twentieth century -- including high-profile African American clergy -- were very much against racial equality, believing that mixing the races would lead to interracial marriages and threaten the social order of American society. The Methodist Unificationilluminates the religious culture of Methodism, Methodists' self-identification as the primary carriers of "American Christian Civilization," and their influence on the crystallization of whiteness during the Jim Crow Era as a legal category and cultural symbol.
Main Description
One of the important sources for the increase of human knowledge is the keeping of careful records of a system over time, the study of which may reveal patterns and relationships that otherwise would not be perceived. Despite the existence of more than 60 years of national income statistics and their various components and supplements, such as unemployment and labor force figures, price levels, relative prices, etc, there has been a dismaying lag in the use of this data to detect previously unrecognized relationships among economic variables. One of the reasons for this disturbing lack of attention to such patterns is the 18th-century celestial-mechanics type of mathematics that is generally in use. Deterministic dynamic mathematical models are often inappropriate to the structural and topological complexities of the economic system, particularly to the instability of its fundamental parameters. This intriguing new book is a step towards an interpretation of the record in terms of topological patterns represented by a variety of graphs. The type of long-run topological analysis on which this book is based reveals some striking properties of the American economy which conventional economics and econometrics have tended to miss. One of these is the relative insignificance of the Federal government, even during the period of the New Deal. Also suggested by the data are the unexpected effects of governmental action. Preeminent economist Kenneth Boulding offers this study not only as a means of coming to a better understanding of our past and present economic systems, but also as an aid to decision-making about the future. If the decisions made in the present are based on unrealistic inferences, he maintains, then they are likely to make the future worse than it might have been.
Main Description
One of the important sources for the increase of human knowledge is the keeping of careful records of a system over time, the study of which may reveal patterns and relationships that otherwise would not be perceived. Despite the existence of more than 60 years of national income statistics and their various components and supplements, such as unemployment and labor force figures, price levels, relative prices, etc, there has been a dismaying lag in the use of this data to detect previously unrecognized relationships among economic variables.One of the reasons for this disturbing lack of attention to such patterns is the 18th-century celestial-mechanics type of mathematics that is generally in use. Deterministic dynamic mathematical models are often inappropriate to the structural and topological complexities of the economic system, particularly to the instability of its fundamental parameters. This intriguing new book is a step towards an interpretation of the record in terms of topological patterns represented by a variety of graphs. The type of long-run topological analysis on which this book is based reveals some striking properties of the American economy which conventional economics and econometrics have tended to miss. One of these is the relative insignificance of the Federal government, even during the period of the New Deal. Also suggested by the data are the unexpected effects of governmental action.Preeminent economist Kenneth Boulding offers this study not only as a means of coming to a better understanding of our past and present economic systems, but also as an aid to decision-making about the future. If the decisions made in the present are based on unrealistic inferences, he maintains, then they are likely to make the future worse than it might have been.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tables
Abbreviations
Preface
The Structure of an Economyp. 1
Human Capitalp. 14
Sizes and Proportional Structures of Total Output and Incomep. 25
Money and Pricesp. 40
Capital Structuresp. 53
The Role of Governmentp. 70
The World Economic Environmentp. 84
Towards Understanding and Controlp. 96
What of the Future?p. 111
Notes and Referencesp. 126
Appendix: Data Tablesp. 129
Indexp. 210
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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