Catalogue


Counting for nothing : what men value and what women are worth /
Marilyn Waring.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c1999.
description
li, 310 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0802082602 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c1999.
isbn
0802082602 :
catalogue key
2922306
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 280-290) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Angry, humorous, well-written, and accessible.'
'As one might expect from a woman courageous enough to make a stand, on a point of principle, that brought down a government, this is a forthright, serious, and eloquent book.'
'I've often commented on the way the work of women is excluded from our national accounting and overlooked in economics in general. And, alas, I've done very little about it. Now this splendid work goes far to fill this appalling gap. No concerned woman (or man) can ignore it.'
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This classic feminist analysis of women's place in the world economy has been brought up to date with a sizeable new introduction. Waring argues that monetary value needs to be attributed to unpaid work -- productive and reproductive -- in order to make this work visible, influence policies and concepts, and question values. Bibliography.
Description for Reader
Safe drinking water counts for nothing. A pollution-free environment counts for nothing. Even some people - namely women - count for nothing. This is the case, at least, according to the United Nations System of National Accounts. Author Marilyn Waring, former New Zealand M.P., now professor, development consultant, writer, and goat farmer, isolates the gender bias that exists in the current system of calculating national wealth.As Waring observes, in this accounting system women are considered 'non-producers' and as such they cannot expect to gain from the distribution of benefits that flow from production. Issues like nuclear warfare, environmental conservation, and poverty are likewise excluded from the calculation of value in traditional economic theory. As a result, public policy, determined by these same accounting processes, inevitably overlooks the importance of the environment and half the world's population.Counting for Nothing, originally published in 1988, is a classic feminist analysis of women's place in the world economy brought up to date in this reprinted edition, including a sizeable new introduction by the author. In her new introduction, the author updates information and examples and revisits the original chapters with appropriate commentary. In an accessible and often humorous manner, Waring offers an explanation of the current economic systems of accounting and thoroughly outlines ways to ensure that the significance of the environment and the labour contributions of women receive the recognition they deserve.
Description for Reader
Safe drinking water counts for nothing. A pollution-free environment counts for nothing. Even some people - namely women - count for nothing. This is the case, at least, according to the United Nations System of National Accounts. Author Marilyn Waring, former New Zealand M.P., now professor, development consultant, writer, and goat farmer, isolates the gender bias that exists in the current system of calculating national wealth. As Waring observes, in this accounting system women are considered 'non-producers' and as such they cannot expect to gain from the distribution of benefits that flow from production. Issues like nuclear warfare, environmental conservation, and poverty are likewise excluded from the calculation of value in traditional economic theory. As a result, public policy, determined by these same accounting processes, inevitably overlooks the importance of the environment and half the world's population. Counting for Nothing, originally published in 1988, is a classic feminist analysis of women's place in the world economy brought up to date in this reprinted edition, including a sizeable new introduction by the author. In her new introduction, the author updates information and examples and revisits the original chapters with appropriate commentary. In an accessible and often humorous manner, Waring offers an explanation of the current economic systems of accounting and thoroughly outlines ways to ensure that the significance of the environment and the labour contributions of women receive the recognition they deserve.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction to the Second Edition
Prologuep. 1
A Woman's Reckoningp. 12
A Calling to Accountp. 37
The Boundary of Conceptionp. 60
Nothing Sexist Herep. 75
The Statistical Conspiracyp. 93
Villainy and Incompetentcep. 118
The Value of Deathp. 135
A Value on Your Timep. 153
The Eye of the Beholderp. 182
"Your Economic Theory Makes No Sense"p. 203
If Counting was the Limit of Intelligencep. 224
Glimpsing the Wholep. 256
Epiloguep. 256
Appendicesp. 265
Notesp. 270
Bibliographyp. 280
Indexp. 291
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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