Catalogue


Movies for the masses : popular cinema and Soviet society in the 1920s /
Denise J. Youngblood.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
description
xix, 259 p., [16] p. of plates : ill.
ISBN
0521374707
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
isbn
0521374707
catalogue key
2897347
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Denise Youngblood is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Vermont. As a specialist in early Soviet social and cultural history, she has written extensively on Soviet cinema, including Soviet cinema in the silent era, 1918-1935. She has served as chair of the Working Group on Cinema and Television (USSR and Eastern Europe) and as vice-president of the International Association for Media History.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-05:
Youngblood's new study builds on her Soviet Cinema in the Silent Era, 1918-1935 (1985) to construct a remarkably detailed picture of the more "commercial" filmmaking trends during the NEP (New Economic Policy) period, 1921-1928. She deftly illuminates the critical and political response to the hitherto largely neglected works of Protozanov, Barnet, and Ermler, among others, whose films were among the best attended between 1924 and 1930. Although she provides no comprehensive analyses of individual films as films, the plot summaries and enlightening mini-biographies of many key figures are useful. Her conclusions about the films' relationship with larger social trends remain sketchier than the book's subtitle promises, largely because the data about spectatorship in the 1920s are unfortunately meager. Her essential claims about the continuity of mass taste through the Tsarist, early revolutionary, and Stalinist periods, however, are amply demonstrated in this well-researched account. The bibliography, especially of Russian sources, is first-rate. Graduate; faculty. S. Liebman; Queens College, CUNY
Reviews
Review Quotes
‘Youngblood is an extremely knowledgeable guide. It seems that she has perused all contemporary film journals and read almost every film review. She wastes no time on over-clever analysis of individual frames; there is no semiotics, deconstruction or any other modern over-valued analytical tool here. Instead we hear the knowledgeable, intelligent and confident voice of an expert. It is a wonderful book.’Peter Kenez, Europe-Asia Studies
'Youngblood is an extremely knowledgeable guide. It seems that she has perused all contemporary film journals and read almost every film review. She wastes no time on over-clever analysis of individual frames; there is no semiotics, deconstruction or any other modern over-valued analytical tool here. Instead we hear the knowledgeable, intelligent and confident voice of an expert. It is a wonderful book.'Peter Kenez, Europe-Asia Studies
' ... we hear the knowledgeable, intelligent and confident voice of an expert. It is a wonderful book.' Soviet Studies
‘ … we hear the knowledgeable, intelligent and confident voice of an expert. It is a wonderful book.’ Soviet Studies
'Youngblood is an extremely knowledgeable guide. It seems that she has perused all contemporary film journals and read almost every film review. She wastes no time on over-clever analysis of individual frames; there is no semiotics, deconstruction or any other modern over-valued analytical tool here. Instead we hear the knowledgeable, intelligent and confident voice of an expert. It is a wonderful book.' Peter Kenez, Europe-Asia Studies
‘[Movies for the masses] is often provocative and stimulating. It is also well written, very readable and has a style that engages both the reader’s attention and the intellect … It provides a wealth of statistical information … and will appeal to a broad spectrum of readers from politics, film and cultural studies … [It] is a ‘good read’ and you leave it knowing more about the period, as well as having your own arguments ‘honed’ by the new evidence and opinions provided.’Roger Powell, Drama
'[Movies for the masses] is often provocative and stimulating. It is also well written, very readable and has a style that engages both the reader's attention and the intellect ... It provides a wealth of statistical information ... and will appeal to a broad spectrum of readers from politics, film and cultural studies ... [It] is a 'good read' and you leave it knowing more about the period, as well as having your own arguments 'honed' by the new evidence and opinions provided.'Roger Powell, Drama
"Movies for the Masses is an excellent survey of the popular cinema of the 1920's and the debates surrounding it." Slavic and East European Journal
'[Movies for the masses] is often provocative and stimulating. It is also well written, very readable and has a style that engages both the reader's attention and the intellect ... It provides a wealth of statistical information ... and will appeal to a broad spectrum of readers from politics, film and cultural studies ... [It] is a 'good read' and you leave it knowing more about the period, as well as having your own arguments 'honed' by the new evidence and opinions provided.' Roger Powell, Drama
"[A] sprightly study of the cinema industry at the dawning f the world's first proletarian state...." Charles A. Ruud, Journal of Modern History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1993
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Summaries
Main Description
This book is a pathbreaking study of the ‘unknown’ Soviet cinema: the popular movies which were central to Soviet film production in the 1920s. Professor Youngblood discusses acting genres, the cinema stars, audiences, and the influences of foreign films and examines three leading filmmakers - Iakov Protazanov, Boris Barnet, and Fridikh Ermler. She also looks at the governmental and industrial circumstances underlying filmmaking practices of the era, and provides an invaluable survey of the contemporary debates concerning official policy on entertainment cinema. Professor Youngblood demonstrates that the film culture of the 1920s was predominantly and aggressively ‘bourgeois’ and enjoyed patronage that cut across class lines and political allegiance. Thus, she argues, the extent to which Western and pre-revolutionary influences, boureois directors and middle-class tastes dominated the film world is as important as the tradition of revolutionary utopianism in understanding the transformation of Soviet culture in the Stalin revolution.
Main Description
This book presents a pathbreaking study of Soviet popular cinema in the 1920s. Professor Youngblood focuses on commercial directors, acting genres, box office hits and audience responses to these films and their stars. She also examines the role of foreign films and the governmental and industrial circumstances underlying filmmaking practices of the era. The author demonstrates that during the first decade after the revolution, Soviet cinema was dominated by "bourgeois" directors and middle class tastes and was greatly influenced by Western and pre-revolutionary film cultures.
Main Description
This book is a pathbreaking study of the 'unknown' Soviet cinema: the popular movies which were central to Soviet film production in the 1920s. Professor Youngblood discusses acting genres, the cinema stars, audiences, and the influences of foreign films and examines three leading filmmakers - Iakov Protazanov, Boris Barnet, and Fridikh Ermler. She also looks at the governmental and industrial circumstances underlying filmmaking practices of the era, and provides an invaluable survey of the contemporary debates concerning official policy on entertainment cinema. Professor Youngblood demonstrates that the film culture of the 1920s was predominantly and aggressively 'bourgeois' and enjoyed patronage that cut across class lines and political allegiance. Thus, she argues, the extent to which Western and pre-revolutionary influences, boureois directors and middle-class tastes dominated the film world is as important as the tradition of revolutionary utopianism in understanding the transformation of Soviet culture in the Stalin revolution.
Description for Bookstore
This book presents a pathbreaking study of Soviet cinema in the 1920s.
Description for Library
This book presents a pathbreaking study of Soviet cinema in the 1920s. Professor Youngblood focuses on commercial directors, acting genres, box office hits and audience responses to these films and their stars. She also examines the role of foreign films and the governmental and industrial circumstances underlying filmmaking practices of the era. She demonstrates that during the first decade after the revolution, Soviet cinema was dominated by 'bourgeois' directors and middle class tastes and was greatly influenced by Western and pre-revolutionary film cultures.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. x
List of tablesp. xii
Prefacep. xiii
Note on translation, transliteration and datesp. xvii
Abbreviations, acronyms, and Russian termsp. xviii
Introductionp. 1
Contexts
A historical overview "from below"p. 13
The entertainment or enlightenment debatep. 35
The inostranshchina in Soviet cinemap. 50
Practice
Genres and hitsp. 71
Images and starsp. 90
Iakov Protazanov, the "Russian Griffith"p. 105
Alternatives
Boris Barnet, Soviet actor/Soviet directorp. 125
Fridrikh Ermler and the social problem filmp. 139
For workers and peasants only - factory and tractor filmsp. 153
Conclusionp. 171
Notesp. 180
Filmographyp. 222
Bibliographyp. 228
Indexp. 250
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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