Catalogue


The Laboratory revolution in medicine /
edited by Andrew Cunningham and Perry Williams.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
description
xi, 347 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521404843 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
isbn
0521404843 (hardback)
general note
Companion v. to: The Medical renaissance of the sixteenth century / edited by A. Wear, R.K. French, and I.M. Lonie. 1985; The Medical revolution of the seventeenth century / edited by Roger French and Andrew Wear. 1989; and The Medical enlightenment of the eighteenth century / edited by Andrew Cunningham and Roger French. 1990.
catalogue key
2896598
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-06:
Since the 1850s, the laboratory has evolved into a dominant and integral component of medicine. Medical research, teaching, diagnosis, and treatment all depend on the laboratory. This dominance is perhaps best exemplified in the current primacy of molecular and genetic medicine, almost entirely laboratory dependent. The social context in which laboratory medicine evolved, the resistances it encountered in its ascendance, and the power and authority it provided to modern medicine form the subject of this revised conference proceedings volume. The "revolution" of the title highlights the political, industrial, and philosophical revolution of the 19th century in which context laboratory medicine developed, and emphasizes the general theme that the laboratory was not a self-evident result of the progress of medicine, but rather the outcome of a group struggle by proponents and a victory of advocates over opponents. Not a chronological recounting of the evolution of laboratory medicine, but a focused look at selective but coherent aspects of the changes that brought it about. An erudite and intelligent work by scholars in laboratory studies, philosophy of science, and history of medicine. Lucidly written, well annotated, and thoughtful, it provides new and stimulating insight into the role and importance of laboratory medicine. Rewarding reading for anyone interested in the history of science and of medicine. General; advanced undergraduate through professional. G. Eknoyan; Baylor College of Medicine
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1993
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Summaries
Main Description
Laboratory medicine developed in the nineteenth century, principally in Germany, France, Britain, and the United States of America. While a number of scholars have studied various aspects of laboratory medicine in the nineteenth century, no attempts have hitherto been made to synthesise such work and to present a view of the whole subject. This book brings together leading researchers on the history of laboratory medicine in Europe and America. Each brings their special expertise to bear on the general subject of the nature and genesis of laboratory medicine. Together, they provide a much needed account of how medicine in Western industrial societies acquired its distinctive power and authority through association with the laboratory. These historical studies are followed by a short concluding section of 'Reflexions' by scholars from the fields of laboratory studies, philosophy of science, and gender studies.
Description for Library
This book brings together leading researchers on the history of laboratory medicine in Europe and America. Each brings their special expertise to bear on the general subject of the nature and genesis of laboratory medicine. Together, they provide a much needed account of how medicine in Western industrial societies acquired its distinctive power and authority through association with the laboratory. These historical studies are followed by a short concluding section of 'Reflexions' by scholars from the fields of laboratory studies, philosophy of science, and gender studies.
Description for Bookstore
This book brings together leading researchers on the history of laboratory medicine in Europe and America. Together, they provide a much needed account of how medicine in Western industrial societies acquired its distinctive power and authority through association with the laboratory.
Table of Contents
List of illustrations
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Laboratories, medicine and public life in Germany, 1830-1849: ideological roots of the institutional revolution Timothy Lenoir
Building institutes for physiology in Prussia, 1836-1846: contexts, interests and rhetoric
The fall and rise of professional mystery: epistemology, authority and the emergence of laboratory medicine in nineteenth-century
Anaesthetics, ethics and aesthetics; vivisection in the late nineteenth-century British laboratory
Scientific elites and laboratory organisation in fin de siecle Paris and Berlin: the Pasteur Institute and Robert Koch's Institute for Infectious Diseases compared
French military epidemiology and the limits of the laboratory: the case of
Transforming plague: the laboratory and the identity of infectious disease
The laboratory as business: Sir Almroth Wright's vaccine programme and the construction of
The costly ghastly kitchen
The laboratory revolution in medicine as rhetorical and aesthetic accomplishment
Gendered reflexions on the laboratory in medicine
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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