Catalogue


New poverty : families in postmodern society /
David Cheal.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1996.
description
xviii, 209 p. : ill.
ISBN
0313294445 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1996.
isbn
0313294445 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2872076
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-02-01:
Cheal, author of two previous books on social policy, offers a comparative analysis of the effects of US and Canadian state-sponsored social security policies on families and children. After characterizing modernizing theories of social change, Cheal concludes that postmodern disarray and despair best describe poverty and social security policies at the end of the 20th century. The most visible result of this disarray is that poor children are relatively worse off than at the century's beginning, despite a century of rhetoric about improving the lives of children. Cheal uses Seebohm Rowntree's famous surveys of poverty in York over the first 35 years of this century to demonstrate the changing incidence of poverty and how it has been affected buy US and Canadian social security concerns. This informed study is built solidly on existing research and adds new statistical analysis of life-course gradients of poverty that usefully compares US and Canadian social security influences. It successfully demonstrates the relationships between shifting family situations and the risks of being poor. Readers cannot escape the force of its overall conclusion that welfare states have produced new forms of relative deprivation rather than social solidarity. A useful book for undergraduates and above. M. J. Moore Appalachian State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"After characterizing modernizing theories of social change, Cheal concludes that postmodern disarray and despair best describe poverty and social security policies at the end of the 20th century. The most visible result of this disarray is that poor children are relatively worse off than at the century's beginning, despite a century of rhetoric about improving the lives of children....This informed study is built solidly on existing research and adds new statistical analysis of life-course gradients of poverty that usefully compares US and Canadian social security influences. It successfully demonstrates the relationships between shifting family situations and the risks of being poor. Readers cannot escape the force of its overall conclusions that welfare states have produced new forms of relative deprivation rather than social solidarity. A useful book for undergraduates and above."- Choice
'œDavid Cheal provides a coherent examination of one of the most important effects of crisis: the "postmodernization of poverty"....[A]n accessible examination of contemporary problems in social policy.'' Review of Radical Political Economics
"David Cheal provides a coherent examination of one of the most important effects of crisis: the "postmodernization of poverty"....[A]n accessible examination of contemporary problems in social policy."- Review of Radical Political Economics
'œDavid Cheal's book is a serious investigation of poverty, and, as such, rigorously specifies measures and elaborates their relative advantages and disadvantages. His writing is often technical although accessible even for a general reader....He writes with precision in regard to the empirical data and illustrates points with clear precision.'' Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal
"David Cheal's book is a serious investigation of poverty, and, as such, rigorously specifies measures and elaborates their relative advantages and disadvantages. His writing is often technical although accessible....He writes with precision in regard to the empirical data and illustrates points with clear examples."- Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal
'œOverall, this book serves as a thoughtful analysis of a serious social ill. As a secondary text, it could prove useful in providing a historical grounding in poverty scholarship. It is clearly written and contains an adequate amount of charts and statistical information about the households and economies in the United States and Canada.'' Families in Society
"Overall, this book serves as a thoughtful analysis of a serious social ill. As a secondary text, it could prove useful in providing a historical grounding in poverty scholarship. It is clearly written and contains an adequate amount of charts and statistical information about the households and economies in the United States and Canada...."- Families in Society
'œAfter characterizing modernizing theories of social change, Cheal concludes that postmodern disarray and despair best describe poverty and social security policies at the end of the 20th century. The most visible result of this disarray is that poor children are relatively worse off than at the century's beginning, despite a century of rhetoric about improving the lives of children....This informed study is built solidly on existing research and adds new statistical analysis of life-course gradients of poverty that usefully compares US and Canadian social security influences. It successfully demonstrates the relationships between shifting family situations and the risks of being poor. Readers cannot escape the force of its overall conclusions that welfare states have produced new forms of relative deprivation rather than social solidarity. A useful book for undergraduates and above.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1997
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Cheal argues that the sociology of poverty has entered a new postmodern phase. The "new poverty" is about loss of faith--in relationships that were once believed to last a lifetime, and in government programs that we used to think would last for generations.
Unpaid Annotation
What is new about the new poverty is the sense of surprise -- that poverty can hit so suddenly, that people can Fall so far before they are caught and lifted up, that the poverty of children still troubles us after a century of progress. Cheal translates the experience of the new poverty from empirical evidence into sociological theory. His purpose is to provoke serious, critical reflection about families today and the risks of being poor.
Long Description
Cheal argues that the sociology of poverty has entered a new postmodern phase. The new poverty is about loss of faithin relationships that were once believed to last a lifetime, and in government programs that we used to think would last for generations. The new poverty is about the economic fall of individuals and countries who used to be affluent and who once dreamed that their affluence would go on forever. It is about the experience of free-falling, without a parachute and without much of a safety net. The new poverty is about people who lose their jobs when their company downsizes. It is about people whose hours of employment are cut in half when the work runs out. And it is about couples who separate, thereby plunging one of themand probably their childreninto a low income level that they had never anticipated. What is new about the new poverty is the sense of surprisethat poverty can hit so suddenly, that people can fall so far before they are caught and lifted up, that the poverty of children still troubles us after a century of progress. The new poverty is about our loss of faith not only in relationships that were once thought to last a lifetime, but also in government programs that we believed would last for generations. Cheal translates the experience of the new poverty into sociological theory and into social statistics. His purpose is to provoke serious, critical reflection about families today and the risks of being poor. An important study for scholars and researchers involved with family issues and social policy.
Long Description
The "new poverty" is about the economic fall of individuals and countries who used to be affluent and who once dreamed that their affluence would go on forever. It is about the experience of free-falling, without a parachute and without much of a safety net. The new poverty is about people who lose their jobs when their company "downsizes." It is about people whose hours of employment are cut in half when the work runs out. And it is about couples who separate, thereby plunging one of them--and probably their children--into a low income level that they had never anticipated. What is new about the new poverty is the sense of surprise--that poverty can hit so suddenly, that people can fall so far before they are caught and lifted up, that the poverty of children still troubles us after a century of progress. The new poverty is about our loss of faith not only in relationships that were once thought to last a lifetime, but also in government programs that we believed would last for generations. Cheal translates the experience of the new poverty into sociological theory and into social statistics. His purpose is to provoke serious, critical reflection about families today and the risks of being poor. An important study for scholars and researchers involved with family issues and social policy.
Table of Contents
Illustrations
Preface
Families in Postmodernity Poverty and Progress
Sorting Out the Poor Marriage and its Aftermath
The Birth of Poverty Family Work Systems Shallow Income Pools
The Economic Life Course Shifting Entitlements
The Postmodernization of Poverty
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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