Catalogue


A rich land, a poor people : politics and society in modern Chiapas /
Thomas Benjamin.
edition
Rev. ed. / with a foreword by Lorenzo Meyer.
imprint
Albuqueque : University of New Mexico Press, 1996.
description
xxvi, 376 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0826317138 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Albuqueque : University of New Mexico Press, 1996.
isbn
0826317138 (pbk.)
local note
ERIN HOLDINGS: c. 1-2.
catalogue key
2867807
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1989-12:
One of several regional studies on Mexico published in the last decade, e.g., Gilbert M. Joseph's Revolution from Without: Yucatan, Mexico, and the United States, 1880-1924 (CH, Oct '82). In this work, Benjamin presents a well-researched and well-documented description of Mexico's southernmost state from 1820 to 1988, showing how it developed within the national setting through major political and economic changes. He describes Chiapas as a rich area, producing coffee, cattle, and other agricultural products, but one in which the Indians and rural poor have never shared in the wealth. The campesinos have continued to live in poverty despite 19th-century development plans and agrarian reforms that came in the wake of the Mexican Revolution. Conditions have further deteriorated since 1970, with the influx of refugees from Guatemala, a major volcanic eruption, and growing political unrest. Written in a clear and easily understood manner, the work will be very useful to the Mexican specialist. The extensive bibliography and notes will serve as further guides for scholars. Upper-division undergraduates and above. -E. H. Moseley, University of Alabama
Summaries
Main Description
Benjamin delineates the basic continuity in the history of Chiapas from the 1890s to 1995.
Unpaid Annotation
Chiapas, a state in southern Mexico, burst into international news in January 1994. Several thousand insurgents, given a voice in the communiques of Subcomandante Marcos, took control of the capital and other key towns and held the Mexican army and government at bay for weeks. Proclaiming themselves the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, they captured both land and headlines. Worldwide, people wanted to know the answer to one question: why had revolutionaries taken over a Mexican state? No other study of Chiapas answers that question as thoroughly as does this book. Benjamin delineates the basic continuity in the history of Chiapas from the 1890s to 1995. The uprising and government's armed occupation of the state are but the latest violent episodes in a region that is now and has always been a rich land worked by poor people. By studying the impoverishment of the laboring class in Chiapas, Benjamin addresses how the Chiapan elite survived the Revolution of 1910 and remain in control of the state's development and destiny.
Main Description
Chiapas, a state in southern Mexico, burst into international news in January 1994. Several thousand insurgents, given a voice in the communiques of Subcomandante Marcos, took control of the capital and other key towns and held the Mexican army and government at bay for weeks. Proclaiming themselves the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, they captured both land and headlines. Worldwide, people wanted to know the answer to one question: why had revolutionaries taken over a Mexican state? No other study of Chiapas answers that question as thoroughly as does this book. The uprising and government's armed occupation of the state are but the latest violent episodes in a region that is now and has always been a rich land worked by poor people. By studying the impoverishment of the laboring class in Chiapas, Benjamin addresses how the Chiapan elite survived the Revolution of 1910 and remain in control of the state's development and destiny. More clearly than anyone else, Benjamin shows in his new final chapter that the contemporary agrarian uprising is the legacy of Chiapan underdevelopment.
Table of Contents
Foreword Lorenzo Meyerp. xi
Prefacep. xvii
Political Abbreviationsp. xxiii
Prologue The Sentiment of Localism Is Very Deeply Rooted (1820s-80s)p. 1
p. 31
On the Road to Real Progressp. 37
One of the Most Progressive Governorsp. 55
The Spirit of Enterprisep. 75
p. 93
A Profound Political Divisionp. 99
To Feel the Effects of the Revolutionp. 119
p. 145
In Defense of Class Interestsp. 149
For the Purpose of Political Orderp. 171
Only for Politics Have the Postulates of the Revolution Been Prostitutedp. 195
Archival Abbreviationsp. 271
Select Bibliographyp. 343
Indexp. 357
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem