Catalogue

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Patronage, power, and poverty in southern Italy : a tale of two cities /
Judith Chubb.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1982.
description
xi, 292 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. --
ISBN
0521236371
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1982.
isbn
0521236371
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
2865584
 
Bibliography: p. 285-289.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Deeply divided between North and South, the Italy of the 1980s represents an unparalleled example of dualistic development, counterposing two profoundly different models of society and politics. In the South, socioeconomic backwardness was matched by the persistence of traditional forms of political behaviour - a politics based primarily on personal ties and patronage rather than on broader bonds of interest or ideology.
Description for Bookstore
Drawing on insights from anthropology, sociology, and political science, this comparative study examines the sources of popular support for clientelism in two resource-scarce Italian towns, Palermo and Naples. It analyzes the relationship between clientelism and economic development, with implications not only for Southern Italy but also for developing nations.
Main Description
Deeply divided between North and South, Italy represents an unparalleled example of dualistic development, counterposing two profoundly different models of society and politics. In the South, socioeconomic backwardness is matched by the persistence of traditional forms of political behaviour - a politics based primarily on personal ties and patronage rather than on broader bonds of interest or ideology. This study seeks to understand the sources of popular support for clientelism in a resource-scarce society such as southern Italy. It analyzes the dynamics of continuity and change in a political system based primarily on clientelism rather than on broader bonds of interest or ideology. The author explores the concrete patronage mechanisms linking the dominant party to each of the major social groups in the city - ranging from the urban poor to the mafia. By contrast, the sections on Naples address the question of the conditions under which political machines may lose their mass base of support.
Main Description
Deeply divided between North and South, the Italy of the 1980s represents an unparalleled example of dualistic development, counterposing two profoundly different models of society and politics. In the South, socioeconomic backwardness was matched by the persistence of traditional forms of political behaviour - a politics based primarily on personal ties and patronage rather than on broader bonds of interest or ideology. This study seeks to understand the sources of popular support for clientelism in a resource-scarce society such as southern Italy. It analyses the dynamics of continuity and change in a political system based primarily on clientelism rather than on broader bonds of interest or ideology. The author explores the concrete patronage mechanisms linking the dominant party to each of the major social groups in the city - ranging from the urban poor to the Mafia. By contrast, the sections on Naples address the question of the conditions under which political machines may have lost their mass base of support.
Table of Contents
List of tables and figures
Acknowledgments
List of abbreviations
Introduction
The Roots of Clientelistic Power
Politics in the South, 1860-1943: regime change and political immobility
The southern economy: modernization without development
Christian democracy in the postwar South: clientelism and the failure of reform
The Social Bases of the Machine
The white-collar middle class
The local entrepreneurial class
The mafia as entrepreneur: the politics of urban expansion and urban renewal
The urban poor: poverty and political control
The urban poor: three neighborhood studies
Why does clientelism survive?
The Prospects and the Limits of Change
Naples under the left
Conclusion
Statistical appendix
Notes
Selected bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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