Catalogue


What difference does a husband make? : women and marital status in Nazi and postwar Germany /
Elizabeth D. Heineman.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1999.
description
xviii, 374 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520214250 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1999.
isbn
0520214250 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2822719
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 323-364) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"A pathbreaking book. Nothing else attempts the broad sweep or comprehensive vision that Heineman offers in this book."--Robert Moeller, author ofProtecting Motherhood
Flap Copy
"A pathbreaking book. Nothing else attempts the broad sweep or comprehensive vision that Heineman offers in this book."--Robert Moeller, author of Protecting Motherhood
Summaries
Long Description
In October 1946, seven million more women than men lived in occupied Germany. In this study of unwed, divorced, widowed, and married women at work and at home across three political regimes, Elizabeth Heineman traces the transitions from early National Socialism through the war and on to the consolidation of democracy in the West and communism in the East. Based on thorough and extensive research in German national and regional archives as well as the archives of the U.S. occupying forces, this pathbreaking book argues that marital status can define women's position and experience as surely as race, gender, sexual orientation, and class. Heineman finds that, while the war made the experience of single women a dramatic one, state activity was equally important. As a result, West German women continued to be defined in large part by their marital status. In contrast, by the time of reunification marital status had become far less significant in the lives of East German women. In one broad, comprehensive sweep, Elizabeth Heineman compares prewar and postwar, East and West, lived experience and public policy. Her sharp analytical insights will enrich our understanding of the history of women in modern Germany and the role of marital status in twentieth-century life worldwide.
Main Description
A study of single, divorced, and widowed women in East and West Germany across three political regimes in Germany, tracing the transitions from early National Socialism, through the war, to the two different forms of government in East and West.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Preface
List of Abbreviations
Introduction: War, Politics, and Marital Statusp. 1
Housewives, Activists, and "Asocials" Controlling Marital Status Under Nazismp. 17
War Wives, Workers, and Race Traitors: Losing Control During Warp. 44
The Hour of the Women: Survival During Defeat and Occupationp. 75
Marriage Rubble: The Crisis in the Family, Public and Privatep. 108
Restoring the Difference: The State and Marital Status in West Germanyp. 137
Narrowing the Difference: The State and Marital Status in East Germanyp. 176
What's the Difference? Marital Status and Everyday Life in the Reconstruction Germanysp. 209
Epilogue: Who's more Emancipated? Feminism, Marital Status, and the Legacy of War and Political Changep. 239
Statistics from Published Reportsp. 247
The Darmstadt Studyp. 252
Notesp. 259
Bibliographyp. 323
Indexp. 365
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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