Catalogue


Serving the master : slavery and society in nineteenth-century Morocco /
Mohammed Ennaji ; translated by Seth Graebner.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : St. Martin's Press, 1999.
description
xxii, 166 p. : map ; 22 cm.
ISBN
031221152X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : St. Martin's Press, 1999.
isbn
031221152X
catalogue key
2814775
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [157]-163) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mohammed Ennaji is Professor at Universite Mohammed V in Rabat, Morocco. Seth Graebner holds an AM in French literature from Harvard University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-11:
Ennaji's book is a meticulous and unique study. Using previously untapped sources and documentary materials--court cases, travel accounts, and archival documents--the author paints a practical, compelling picture of the experience of slaves in 19th-century Morocco, covering all aspects of their existence. Ennaji treats slavery in the western world of Islam, often overlooked in other works on the subject. The book is a solid study of a whole people forced into abject living and eventual oblivion, and is written with passion, understanding, and relentless respect for the truth. The result is compelling reading. Ennaji (Univ. of Muhammad V, Rabat) is an anthropologist and specialist in the economic history of the Muslim world, with a particular interest rural sociology. All levels. C. E. Farah; University of Minnesota
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The book is a solid study of a whole people forced into abject living and eventual oblivion, and is written with passion, understanding, and relentless respect for the truth. The result is compelling reading." --Choice
"The book is a solid study of a whole people forced into abject living and eventual oblivion, and is written with passion, understanding, and relentless respect for the truth. The result is compelling reading."--Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Muslim Slavery uses a unique wealth of hitherto unstudied sources to paint a practical, compelling picture of the experiences of slaves in nineteenth-century Morocco. Mohammed Ennaji brings to life a rich panoply of figures, with court cases, travel accounts, and archival documents, demonstrating the cruelty of an institution whose benign features some writers have overemphasized. In contrast to slavery in the Americas, he argues that only a fine line separated the fluid categories of slave and free, andhe reveals how slaves' dependence on their masters paralleled free Moroccans' dependence on patrons for survival and social mobility. No other book on slavery in the Islamic world has treated the Muslim west, and no other book has examined the variety and extent of sources that Ennaji does in such a context here. Muslim Slavery offers a clear, readable history that tells the devastating story of slavery in this region, and uses slavery's gradual disappearance in this century as a metaphor for Morocco's move into modernity.
Main Description
Muslim Slavery uses a unique wealth of hitherto unstudied sources to paint a practical, compelling picture of the experiences of slaves in nineteenth-century Morocco. Mohammed Ennaji brings to life a rich panoply of figures, with court cases, travel accounts, and archival documents, demonstrating the cruelty of an institution whose benign features some writers have overemphasized. In contrast to slavery in the Americas, he argues that only a fine line separated the fluid categories of slave and free, and he reveals how slaves' dependence on their masters paralleled free Moroccans' dependence on patrons for survival and social mobility. No other book on slavery in the Islamic world has treated the Muslim west, and no other book has examined the variety and extent of sources that Ennaji does in such a context here. Muslim Slavery offers a clear, readable history that tells the devastating story of slavery in this region, and uses slavery's gradual disappearance in this century as a metaphor for Morocco's move into modernity.
Description for Bookstore
Muslim Slaveryuses a unique wealth of hitherto unstudied sources to paint a practical, compelling picture of the experiences of slaves in nineteenth-century Morocco. Mohammed Ennaji brings to life a rich panoply of figures, with court cases, travel accounts, and archival documents, demonstrating the cruelty of an institution whose benign features some writers have overemphasized. In contrast to slavery in the Americas, he argues that only a fine line separated the fluid categories of slave and free, and he reveals how slaves' dependence on their masters paralleled free Moroccans' dependence on patrons for survival and social mobility. No other book on slavery in the Islamic world has treated the Muslim west, and no other book has examined the variety and extent of sources that Ennaji does in such a context here.Muslim Slaveryoffers a clear, readable history that tells the devastating story of slavery in this region, and uses slavery's gradual disappearance in this century as a metaphor for Morocco's move into modernity.
Table of Contents
Mapp. ix
Note on Transcriptionsp. xi
Glossaryp. xiii
Chronologyp. xv
Prefacep. xvii
Introductionp. xxi
Slaves in Societyp. 1
Daily Lifep. 11
Family and Sexualityp. 31
Escapep. 43
Emancipationp. 53
Kidnappingp. 67
Enslavementp. 79
Slaves of the Makhzenp. 91
Abolitionp. 107
Abbreviationsp. 125
Notesp. 127
Bibliographyp. 157
Indexp. 165
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem