Catalogue


Wounded Knee 1973 : a personal account /
by Stanley David Lyman ; edited by Floyd A. O'Neil, June K. Lyman & Susan McKay ; foreword by Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1991.
description
xxxix, 180 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., map ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0803228899 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1991.
isbn
0803228899 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2812768
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [169]-171) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-02:
An important firsthand perspective on the dramatic events that took place on the Pine Ridge Reservation in the spring of 1973, when American Indian Movement protestors laid siege to Wounded Knee, South Dakota. What led to the armed standoff with federal and tribal officials was the failure of local AIM members to impeach Pine Ridge President Dick Wilson. When legal procedures failed, the scene was set for a staged act of violence as AIM members destroyed property and threatened lives. Despite pleas from the tribe, federal authorities refused to move against the occupying forces. Almost all previous works about Wounded Knee have been written by individuals sympathetic to the AIM. This volume, an intermittent diary kept by Bureau of Indian Affairs Superintendent Stanley D. Lyman, is the first important account by a US official involved in the events. Lyman comes across as a man thoroughly acquainted with Sioux history and the Pine Ridge situation. Unfortunately, Lyman took his orders directly from Nixon's White House, which saw only a public relations problem. The result was a victory for AIM leaders, who cowed both the government and a majority of the Oglala Sioux. But it was a classic Pyrrhic victory because public opinion equated AIM with violence, thus giving white Americans an excuse to ignore reservation conditions. College, university, and public libraries.-G. Thompson, University of Toledo
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1992
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Summaries
Main Description
Stanley Lyman, who was the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) superintendent at the Pine Ridge Reservation in 1973, gives an inside view of what happened when the American Indian Movement (AIM) activists occupied the village of Wounded Knee. Close to the action, he recorded it with unusual candor, directing his sorrow, frustration, and occasional anger to all parties involvedthe Tribal Council, the Justice Department, the BIA, FBI, and AIM. His account of the besiegers and besieged reveals a well-meaning and intelligent man forced by dramatic events to reevaluate some long-cherished assumptions. It deserves to be read and studied in any attempt to understand fully Wounded Knee II.
Main Description
Stanley Lyman, who was the Bureau of Indian Affairs superintendent at the Pine Ridge Reservation in 1973, gives an inside view of what happened when AIM (American Indian Movement) activists occupied the village of Wounded Knee. Photos. Map. Bibliography. Index.
Main Description
"Superintendent Lyman's running account of the tense events of the siege, as he saw them, [supplies] one of the most important and hitherto missing perspectives of Wounded Knee II."-Alvin M. Josephy Jr. in his foreword "This book, a diary of Stanley David Lyman, tells with gripping immediacy what went on among the besiegers. . . . Wounded Knee 1973 is an important document that provides a missing perspective to what Lyman believed was a 'revolution,' pure and simple. But as he puts down his thoughts and emotions of those critical times, in which lives quite literally were in the balance, Lyman sees a government confused, poor communications, ignorance, bureaucratic ineptitude and intolerance to the extreme."-Salt Lake Tribune. "This book succeeds in sending chills through the mind of any reader who has ever endured multi-agency participation in any form. . . . Cultures clashed at Wounded Knee, and the echoes can still be heard in [these] pages."-Wilson Library Bulletin. "In a day of activist concern over the heated issues of society, this book is a timely reminder of the complexity of finding appropriate solutions."-Utah Historical Quarterly Stanley Lyman, who was the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) superintendent at the Pine Ridge Reservation in 1973, gives an inside view of what happened when the American Indian Movement (AIM) activists occupied the village of Wounded Knee. Close to the action, he recorded it with unusual candor, directing his sorrow, frustration, and occasional anger to all parties involved-the Tribal Council, the Justice Department, the BIA, FBI, and AIM. His account of the besiegers and besieged reveals a well-meaning and intelligent man forced by dramatic events to reevaluate some long-cherished assumptions. It deserves to be read and studied in any attempt to understand fully Wounded Knee II. Floyd A. O'Neil and Susan McKay edited Wounded Knee 1973 with the help of the author's widow, June K Lyman. Alvin Josephy, Jr., who describes this book as "a very human document of an 'odd man out' in great personal travail," is the author of Red Power: The American Indians' Fight for Freedom (Bison Book, 1985).
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. vi
Forewordp. vii
Introductionp. xv
The Diaryp. 1
February 22, 1973p. 3
March 27, 1973p. 8
March 28, 1973p. 17
March 29, 1973p. 23
March 30, 1973p. 28
March 31, 1973p. 37
April 1, 1973p. 42
April 2, 1973p. 45
April 3, 1973p. 50
April 5, 1973p. 61
April 6, 1973p. 64
April 9, 1973p. 70
April 16, 1973p. 85
April 18, 1973p. 91
April 20, 1973p. 95
April 22, 1973p. 100
April 24, 1973p. 106
April 25, 1973p. 113
May 1, 1973p. 119
May 3, 1973p. 123
May 6, 1973p. 127
May 8, 1973p. 135
May 9, 1973p. 145
May 10, 1973p. 146
May 14,1973p. 149
May 16, 1973p. 153
June 16, 1973p. 155
June 17, 1973p. 160
July 13, 1973p. 162
Epiloguep. 167
Additional Readingp. 169
Indexp. 173
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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