Catalogue


Ideas and forces in Soviet legal history : a reader on the Soviet state and law /
edited by Zigurds L. Zile.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1992.
description
xxxi, 551 p.
ISBN
0195055950
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1992.
isbn
0195055950
catalogue key
2806530
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An invaluable tool in a course on comparative law to understand 'theRussian Soul.' Professor Zile's choice of extracts from authors rangingchronologically from the XIXth through the XXth century and philosophically fromthe Left to the political Right is most commendable. This book should be, atleast, recommended reading for serious students of comparative law."--RodolpheJ.A. De Seife, Northern Illinois University
"A prodigious achievement that will have a significant impact on teaching and scholarship on the USSR. Only a legal scholar of the first rank and a master translator could have made such an extraordinary selection of primary and secondary materials--including laws, cases, commentaries,constitutional excerpts, speeches, even official telegrams--and made of it such a persuasive presentation of the ideas and forces that shape Soviet legal, political, and economic history."--Robert Sharlet, Union College
"A prodigious achievement that will have a significant impact on teachingand scholarship on the USSR. Only a legal scholar of the first rank and amaster translator could have made such an extraordinary selection of primary andsecondary materials--including laws, cases, commentaries, constitutionalexcerpts, speeches, even official telegrams--and made of it such a persuasivepresentation of the ideas and forces that shape Soviet legal, political, andeconomic history."--Robert Sharlet, Union College
"A very good selection, well-organized, an excellent source book."--F.T. Edgar, Culver Stockton College
"A very good selection, well-organized, an excellent source book."--F.T.Edgar, Culver Stockton College
"The editor has managed to assemble 400 texts which present such a fascinating and occasionally shocking picture of the seven decades of Soviet power that I repeatedly found it difficult to put the book away. It would require a writer of exceptional talent to produce an image of equal clarityin a monograph of similar length."--Review of Central and Eastern Europe Law 1993
"The editor has managed to assemble 400 texts which present such afascinating and occasionally shocking picture of the seven decades of Sovietpower that I repeatedly found it difficult to put the book away. It wouldrequire a writer of exceptional talent to produce an image of equal clarity in amonograph of similar length."--Review of Central and Eastern Europe Law1993
"Admirable and magisterial collection... A wider readership beyond Zigurds Zile's law students may benefit from the fruits of his experience... Translations are first-rate... wiil likely become a noteworthy addition to post-Soviet reading lists. Kudos to Buttino for assembling a well-conceivedset of nationalities-related demographic appendices."--Slavic Review
"Admirable and magisterial collection... A wider readership beyond ZigurdsZile's law students may benefit from the fruits of his experience...Translations are first-rate... wiil likely become a noteworthy addition topost-Soviet reading lists. Kudos to Buttino for assembling a well-conceived setof nationalities-related demographic appendices."--Slavic Review
"A fascinating anthology. Its great virtue is that it presents crucial 'non-legal' documents that cast a true light on Soviet law in practice through the years, not just 'legal' materials that were carefully sanitized before publication. This is a valuable work, and I definitely recommendit."--Maimon Schwarzschild, University of San Diego
"A first-rate piece of work that will find a solid place in law school courses and in upper-level and graduate courses in political science and history. It shows Zile's broad mastery of the subject, particularly of the historical evolution of the Soviet state."--Donald D. Barry, LehighUniversity
"A first-rate piece of work that will find a solid place in law schoolcourses and in upper-level and graduate courses in political science andhistory. It shows Zile's broad mastery of the subject, particularly of thehistorical evolution of the Soviet state."--Donald D. Barry, LehighUniversity
"An invaluable tool in a course on comparative law to understand 'the Russian Soul.' Professor Zile's choice of extracts from authors ranging chronologically from the XIXth through the XXth century and philosophically from the Left to the political Right is most commendable. This book shouldbe, at least, recommended reading for serious students of comparative law."--Rodolphe J.A. De Seife, Northern Illinois University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Soviet practice has variously questioned, rejected, debased and affirmedlaw and its institutions. This new anthology of over 400 documents--includinglegislation, judicial decisions, legal commentary, political statements, andobservations on history and social theory--examines and assesses thesignificance of once-dominant patterns in Soviet thought, guiding studentstoward an understanding of the present by exploring the past. Recent Sovietviews toward nature and the role of law, ways of governance, the intensity ofconflict between individual and common interest, and the extent of socialdisorganization may reflect change, but Zile argues that it is the conditionsand experience of the past that are most likely to affect change. Presentingboth the voices of the erstwhile victors and the vanquished from within theSoviet experience, this book challenges students and scholars of law and Soviethistory to rethink their notions of Soviet legal culture.
Main Description
Soviet practice has variously questioned, rejected, debased and affirmed law and its institutions. This new anthology of over 400 documents--including legislation, judicial decisions, legal commentary, political statements, and observations on history and social theory--examines and assessesthe significance of once-dominant patterns in Soviet thought, guiding students toward an understanding of the present by exploring the past. Recent Soviet views toward nature and the role of law, ways of governance, the intensity of conflict between individual and common interest, and the extent ofsocial disorganization may reflect change, but Zile argues that it is the conditions and experience of the past that are most likely to affect change. Presenting both the voices of the erstwhile victors and the vanquished from within the Soviet experience, this book challenges students and scholarsof law and Soviet history to rethink their notions of Soviet legal culture.
Table of Contents
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
XIV
XV
XVI
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem