Catalogue

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Better than plowing, and other personal essays /
James M. Buchanan.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1992.
description
ix, 184 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0226078167 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
personal subject
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1992.
isbn
0226078167 (cloth)
catalogue key
2794091
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-07:
This collection of 12 broadly autobiographical essays represents a personal history of well-known and controversial economist (and avid rusticator) Buchanan, the Nobel Prize winner who originated public choice theory. The essays are centered around a series of significant events that shaped his career, begun in rural poverty in Tennessee. Buchanan's ideas had an enormous influence on Reagan-era economics, but his book is most valuable in its exploration of the surprising twists and turns that shaped his views. Thus, this fascinating insider's account of the life of an academic economist is most appropriate for libraries at universities with major graduate programs in economics.-- Richard C. Schiming, Mankato State Univ., Minn. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, July 1992
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Summaries
Main Description
"The simple exchange of apples and oranges between two traders--this institutional model is the starting point for all that I have done," writes Buchanan. "Contrast this with the choice between apples and oranges in the utility-maximizing calculus of Robinson Crusoe. [This is] what most economists do." James M. Buchanan has always seemed an outsider--to establishment America, to the political values of modern academia, and to the orthodoxies of his parent discipline. Yet in addition to earning the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1986, he is recognized as the theoretical inspiration for much of the Reagan era's economic philosophy, the father of public choice theory, and a powerful exponent of libertarian ideals. Bluntly honest and always engaging, these twelve autobiographical essays recount and clarify the major influences on the unusual intellectual career of one of our most gifted and insightful thinkers. And his career has been unusual, for there have been few Nobel Laureates who have emerged from the genteel poverty of the rural South and fewer still who hoe their own cabbages. Equally down-to-earth, Buchanan's personal essays provide a unique perspective on how tradition, family, chance, and scholarship came together to shape his career.
Main Description
"The simple exchange of apples and oranges between two tradersthis institutional model is the starting point for all that I have done," writes Buchanan. "Contrast this with the choice between apples and oranges in the utility-maximizing calculus of Robinson Crusoe. [This is] what most economists do." James M. Buchanan has always seemed an outsiderto establishment America, to the political values of modern academia, and to the orthodoxies of his parent discipline. Yet in addition to earning the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1986, he is recognized as the theoretical inspiration for much of the Reagan era's economic philosophy, the father of public choice theory, and a powerful exponent of libertarian ideals. Bluntly honest and always engaging, these twelve autobiographical essays recount and clarify the major influences on the unusual intellectual career of one of our most gifted and insightful thinkers. And his career has been unusual, for there have been few Nobel Laureates who have emerged from the genteel poverty of the rural South and fewer still who hoe their own cabbages. Equally down-to-earth, Buchanan's personal essays provide a unique perspective on how tradition, family, chance, and scholarship came together to shape his career.
Unpaid Annotation
"The simple exchange of apples and oranges between two traders--this institutional model is the starting point for all that I have done," writes Buchanan. "Contrast this with the choice between apples and oranges in the utility-maximizing calculus of Robinson Crusoe. This is what most economists do." James M. Buchanan has always seemed an outsider--to establishment America, to the political values of modern academia, and to the orthodoxies of his parent discipline. Yet in addition to earning the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1986, he is recognized as the theoretical inspiration for much of the Reagan era's economic philosophy, the father of public choice theory, and a powerful exponent of libertarian ideals. Bluntly honest and always engaging, these twelve autobiographical essays recount and clarify the major influences on the unusual intellectual career of one of our most gifted and insightful thinkers. And his career has been unusual, for there have been few Nobel Laureates who have emerged from the genteel poverty of the rural South and fewer still who hoe their own cabbages. Equally down-to-earth, Buchanan's personal essays provide a unique perspective on how tradition, family, chance, and scholarship came together to shape his career.
Table of Contents
Preface
Better than Plowingp. 1
Early Timesp. 19
At the Turn of a Half-Century: Middle Tennessee and Murfreesboro, 1936-40p. 35
An Easy Warp. 48
Born-again Economistp. 68
Italian Retrospectivep. 82
Virginia Political Economy: Some Personal Reflectionsp. 93
Country Aestheticp. 109
Words Written Downp. 127
From the Inside Looking Outp. 147
Nobelityp. 158
Threescore Years and Tenp. 174
Indexp. 181
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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