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The Georgia Dutch : from the Rhine and Danube to the Savannah, 1733-1783 /
George Fenwick Jones.
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1992.
description
xi, 364 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0820313939 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1992.
isbn
0820313939 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2780592
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 327-336) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-06-01:
This extremely detailed chronicle of the various German-speaking groups who settled in the colony of Georgia traces their movements from Europe to settlements on the Savannah River, then describes the failure of their communities and their dispersion throughout the continent after the American Revolution. Professor emeritus Jones (German and comparative literature, Univ. of Maryland) has spent a lifetime scouring European and American archives for material, and he gives the reader full benefit of his labors. In addition to the chronological account, he includes three topical summaries covering the groups' complex religious beliefs and domestic economy, their health and daily life, and their perceptions of Indians and blacks. Of particular interest to genealogists and historians of the colonial South. For research collections.-- David B. Mattern, Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1993-03:
Jones's extensively detailed account of the early German population in Colonial Georgia is intended "as a chronicle, not as an analysis." Jones provides in-depth reports on the transports that carried German immigrants to the colony, detailed relations of the development of German communities, and valuable extrapolations of variant spellings of German names in America. He traces his subjects from their European origins through the post-Revolutionary "diaspora" of the tightly knit Georgia communities. The work is replete with long lists of names and excessive, full quotations of lengthy documents. Although Jones relies heavily on archival manuscript sources, reflecting his expert grasp of German culture, his work also reflects a lack of understanding of the other cultures present. He too readily accepts, for instance, misconceptions such as the belief that "Indians in Georgia were few in number, they were nomadic, and it was beneath the dignity of Indian men to work. . . ." Jones concludes the book with three topical "Summaries" on the themes of religion and economic activities, medicine and daily life, and relations with Indians, slaves, and the military. These essays appear to be collections of isolated anecdotes, lacking in cohesive unity, that failed to fit into the narrative text. Primarily useful to specialists. M. J. Puglisi; Emory and Henry College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Offers a wealth of invaluable, carefully assembled data on a hitherto marginalized topic and challenges the interpretative imagination of future historians."-- Journal of American History
"Offers a wealth of invaluable, carefully assembled data on a hitherto marginalized topic and challenges the interpretative imagination of future historians."--Journal of American History
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 1992
Choice, March 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This is the first comprehensive history of the German-speaking settlers who emigrated to the Georgia colony from Germany, Alsace, Switzerland, Austria, and adjacent regions. Known collectively as the Georgia Dutch, they were the colony's most enterprising early settlers, and they played a vital role in gaining Britain's toehold in a territory also coveted by Spain and France. The main body of the book is a chronological account of the Georgia Dutch from their earliest arrival in 1733 to their dispersal and absorption into what was, by 1783, an Anglo-American populace. Underscoring the harsh daily life of the common settler, George Fenwick Jones also highlights noteworthy individuals and events. He traces recurrent themes, including tensions between the realities of the settlers' lives and the aspirations and motivations of the colony's trustees and supporters; the web of relations between German- and English-speaking whites, African Americans, and Native Americans; and early signs of the genesis of a distinctly new and American sensibility. Three summary chapters conclude The Georgia Dutch . Merging new material with information from previous chapters, Jones offers the most complete depiction to date of Georgia Dutch culture and society. Included are discussions of religion; health and medicine; education; welfare and charity; industry, agriculture, trade, and commerce; Native-American affairs; slavery; domestic life and customs; the arts; and military and legal concerns. Based on twenty-five years of research with primary documents in Europe and the United States, The Georgia Dutch is a welcome reappraisal of an ethnic group whose role in colonial history has, over time, been unfairly minimized.
Main Description
This is the first comprehensive history of the German-speaking settlers who emigrated to the Georgia colony from Germany, Alsace, Switzerland, Austria, and adjacent regions. Known collectively as the Georgia Dutch, they were the colony's most enterprising early settlers, and they played a vital role in gaining Britain's toehold in a territory also coveted by Spain and France.The main body of the book is a chronological account of the Georgia Dutch from their earliest arrival in 1733 to their dispersal and absorption into what was, by 1783, an Anglo-American populace. Underscoring the harsh daily life of the common settler, George Fenwick Jones also highlights noteworthy individuals and events. He traces recurrent themes, including tensions between the realities of the settlers' lives and the aspirations and motivations of the colony's trustees and supporters; the web of relations between German- and English-speaking whites, African Americans, and Native Americans; and early signs of the genesis of a distinctly new and American sensibility.Three summary chapters concludeThe Georgia Dutch. Merging new material with information from previous chapters, Jones offers the most complete depiction to date of Georgia Dutch culture and society. Included are discussions of religion; health and medicine; education; welfare and charity; industry, agriculture, trade, and commerce; Native-American affairs; slavery; domestic life and customs; the arts; and military and legal concerns.Based on twenty-five years of research with primary documents in Europe and the United States, The Georgia Dutch is a welcome reappraisal of an ethnic group whose role in colonial history has, over time, been unfairly minimized.
Unpaid Annotation
This is the first comprehensive history of the German-speaking settlers who emigrated to the Georgia colony from Germany, Alsace, Switzerland, Austria, and adjacent regions. Known collectively as the Georgia Dutch, they were the colony's most enterprising early settlers, and they played a vital role in gaining Britain's toehold in a territory also coveted by Spain and France. The main body of the book is a chronological account of the Georgia Dutch from their earliest arrival in 1733 to their dispersal and absorption into what was, by 1783, an Anglo-American populace. Underscoring the harsh daily life of the common settler, George Fenwick Jones also highlights noteworthy individuals and events. He traces recurrent themes, including tensions between the realities of the settlers' lives and the aspirations and motivations of the colony's trustees and supporters; the web of relations between German- and English-speaking whites, African Americans, and Native Americans; and early signs of the genesis of a distinctly new and American sensibility. Three summary chapters conclude The Georgia Dutch. Merging new material with information from previous chapters, Jones offers the most complete depiction to date of Georgia Dutch culture and society. Included are discussions of religion; health and medicine; education; welfare and charity; industry, agriculture, trade, and commerce; Native-American affairs; slavery; domestic life and customs; the arts; and military and legal concerns. Based on twenty-five years of research with primary documents in Europe and the United States, The Georgia Dutch is a welcome reappraisal of an ethnic group whose role in colonial history has, over time, been unfairlyminimized.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
The European Backgroundp. 1
Arrival in Georgiap. 33
The Georgia Palatinesp. 68
Acton and Vernonburgp. 86
Success at Ebenezerp. 114
Swabian and Later Immigrantsp. 139
Decline of Ebenezerp. 171
Diasporap. 193
Sum. 1 Manna from Heaven and Earthp. 201
Sum. 2 Health, Medicine, and Daily Lifep. 231
Sum. 3 Indians, Slaves, and Soldiersp. 258
Notesp. 281
Bibliographyp. 327
Indexp. 337
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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