Catalogue


Youth in Canadian politics : participation and involvement /
Kathy Megyery, editor.
imprint
Ottawa : Royal Commission on Electoral Reform and Party Financing and Canada Communications Group, Supply and Services Canada and Dundurn Press, 1991.
description
xviii, 124 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1550021044
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Ottawa : Royal Commission on Electoral Reform and Party Financing and Canada Communications Group, Supply and Services Canada and Dundurn Press, 1991.
isbn
1550021044
general note
Issued also in French under title: Les Jeunes et la vie politique au Canada.
catalogue key
2767853
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
When is a person mature enough to vote? Would lowering the voting age compromise political processes? Would giving people the vote stir them to greater involvement? What would be the effect on other laws affecting youth? What are the Charter implications? The studies in this volume uncover a wide range of opinion about young people and their involvement in politics. The author point to the diversity of perceptions about the attitudes and attributes of youth, even among young people themselves. In considering the appropriate age for the vote, they cast light on the overall status of young Canadians in terms of rights, laws, institutions, and public opinion. Raymond Hudon and colleagues study political involvement by Quebecois youth. Patrice Garant investigates legal and Charter implications of lowering the voting age. Jon Pammett and John Myles argue that lowering the voting ages to 16 would be a "low-risk" initiative. All concur that generalizing about 16- to 18-year-olds is as difficult and questionable as making sweeping statements about any othe rage-defined sociological group.
Main Description
When is a person mature enough to vote? Would lowering the voting age compromise political processes? Would giving people the vote stir them to greater involvement? What would be the effect on other laws affecting youth? What are the Charter implications?The studies in this volume uncover a wide range of opinion about young people and their involvement in politics. The author point to the diversity of perceptions about the attitudes and attributes of youth, even among young people themselves. In considering the appropriate age for the vote, they cast light on the overall status of young Canadians in terms of rights, laws, institutions, and public opinion.Raymond Hudon and colleagues study political involvement by Quebecois youth. Patrice Garant investigates legal and Charter implications of lowering the voting age. Jon Pammett and John Myles argue that lowering the voting ages to 16 would be a low-risk initiative. All concur that generalizing about 16- to 18-year-olds is as difficult and questionable as making sweeping statements about any othe rage-defined sociological group.

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