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A flannel shirt and liberty : British emigrant gentlewomen in the Canadian West, 1880-1914 /
edited by Susan Jackel.
imprint
Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press, c1982.
description
xxvii, 229 p., [12] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0774801492 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press, c1982.
isbn
0774801492 :
catalogue key
276043
 
Gift - Metro Library (MAIN)
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Summaries
Long Description
The plight of educated single women without means was a major socialissue in Britain at the turn of the century. Since there were a millionmore women than men, the future of a genteel spinster was far fromsecure. Marriage was a financial matter -- a business essential to hereconomic and social status, and the penalties for 'failure inbusiness'were severe. Emigration to the colonies offered a wayout, and no place advertised more energetically for these'redundant'women than the Canadian West. This collection of articles and extracts from books and periodicalsdescribes in detail the opportunities in Western Canada for Britishwomen emigrants. By 1900 there was a great demand both for wives andfor workers in a variety of occupations. 'Women Wanted'was themessage conveyed by Canadian officials, journalists, andpublic-spirited women who travelled across Canada and reported on theirfindings. Emigration societies, training schools, welcoming hostels, andimmigration authorities all assisted in the transfer to Canada of theadventurous gentlewomen who responded to the challenge. Life in thenewly settled West was seldom easy for them. To some it was a life ofunaccustomed drudgery, loneliness, and prejudice. But others rejoicedin the wild prairie spaces and discovered a new sense of independenceand self-worth. Moira O'Neill writes: 'I like both the work andthe play here, the time out of doors and the time for coming home. Ilike the summer and the winter, the monotony and the change. Besides Ilike a flannel shirt and liberty.'
Main Description
The plight of educated single women without means was a major social issue in Britain at the turn of the century. Since there were a million more women than men, the future of a genteel spinster was far from secure. Marriage was a financial matter -- a business essential to her economic and social status, and the penalties for 'failure in business' were severe. Emigration to the colonies offered a way out, and no place advertised more energetically for these 'redundant' women than the Canadian West. This collection of articles and extracts from books and periodicals describes in detail the opportunities in Western Canada for British women emigrants. By 1900 there was a great demand both for wives and for workers in a variety of occupations. 'Women Wanted' was the message conveyed by Canadian officials, journalists, and public-spirited women who travelled across Canada and reported on their findings. Emigration societies, training schools, welcoming hostels, and immigration authorities all assisted in the transfer to Canada of the adventurous gentlewomen who responded to the challenge. Life in the newly settled West was seldom easy for them. To some it was a life of unaccustomed drudgery, loneliness, and prejudice. But others rejoiced in the wild prairie spaces and discovered a new sense of independence and self-worth. Moira O'Neill writes: 'I like both the work and the play here, the time out of doors and the time for coming home. I like the summer and the winter, the monotony and the change. Besides I like a flannel shirt and liberty.'
Main Description
This collection of articles and extracts from books and periodicalsdescribes in detail the opportunities in Western Canada for Britishwomen emigrants. By 1900 there was a great demand both for wives andfor workers in a variety of occupations. 'Women Wanted'was themessage conveyed by Canadian officials, journalists, andpublic-spirited women who travelled across Canada and reported on theirfindings.
Table of Contents
Photographic Creditsp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. xiii
the Beginnings: the 1880'sp. 1
From a Lady's Life on a Farm in Manitoba Commentaryp. 3
What Women Say of the Canadian North-West Commentaryp. 31
Women Wanted Commentaryp. 68
the Doldrums: the 1890'sp. 75
The 1890's Commentaryp. 77
the Wheat-Boom Years: 1905-1914p. 121
From a Woman in Canada Commentaryp. 123
Land and the Woman in Canada Commentaryp. 150
From a Home-Help in Canada Commentaryp. 189
The Women of the West Commentaryp. 218
The Woman Canada Needs Commentaryp. 222
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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