Catalogue


Activism in American librarianship, 1962-1973 /
edited by Mary Lee Bundy and Frederick J. Stielow.
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1987.
description
x, 207 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. --
ISBN
0313246025 (lib. bdg. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1987.
isbn
0313246025 (lib. bdg. : alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
2759850
 
Bibliography: p. [197]-198.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œBundy and Stielow designed Activism in American Librarianship, 1962-1973 to address two key questions: How did the various social movements of the time express themselves in librarianship? What happened to the various library institutions during this era? Their collection of essays is presented as a 'ground breaker' in 'documenting and interpreting the Sixties in librariansip.' Activism is a pivotal work. This is the first monograph-length analysis of an unprecedented period in our professional history. . . . The fifteen essays included in Activism were specially commissioned of eminent leaders such as E.J. Josey, Kay Ann Cassell, Fay Blake, Major Owens, Mary Lee Bundy, John Axam, and Robert P. Haro, who helped create and were witness to the events of this decade. . . . Activism achieves its goals. It should be required reading for all students of library history and scholars interested in the interaction between professions and social change.'' RQ
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Summaries
Long Description
This collection of essays, written by library professionals who took an active role in the various rights movements, the war on poverty, and the campaign to end the Vietnam war, is the first serious exanination of the subject. The author offers a thoughtful review of the struggles of activists to achieve institutional change within their profession and the overall effect of these social movements on the outlook and professionalism of a new generation of librarians.
Unpaid Annotation
"Bundy and Stielow designed Activism in American Librarianship, 1962-1973 to address two key questions: How did the various social movements of the time express themselves in librarianship? What happened to the various library institutions during this era? . . . Activism is a pivotal work. This is the first monograph-length analysis of an unprecedented period in our professional history. . . . The fifteen essays included in Activism were specially commissioned of eminent leaders such as E.J. Josey, Kay Ann Cassell, Fay Blake, Major Owens, Mary Lee Bundy, John Axam, and Robert P. Haro, who helped create and were witness to the events of this decade. . . . It should be required reading for all students of library history and scholars interested in interaction between professions and social change." RQ This is a useful work of scholarship. In addition to presenting facts, it will speak different things to different people, depending on individual reactions to the social and political elements that were addressed by librarian activists in the Sixties. Whatever the individual reactions, this is a book that should not be ignored." International Journal of Reviews in Library and Information Science
Long Description
Bundy and Stielow designed Activism in American Librarianship, 1962-1973 to address two key questions: How did the various social movements of the time express themselves in librarianship? What happened to the various library institutions during this era? . . . Activism is a pivotal work. This is the first monograph-length analysis of an unprecedented period in our professional history. . . . The fifteen essays included in Activism were specially commissioned of eminent leaders such as E.J. Josey, Kay Ann Cassell, Fay Blake, Major Owens, Mary Lee Bundy, John Axam, and Robert P. Haro, who helped create and were witness to the events of this decade. . . . It should be required reading for all students of library history and scholars interested in interaction between professions and social change. RQ This is a useful work of scholarship. In addition to presenting facts, it will speak different things to different people, depending on individual reactions to the social and political elements that were addressed by librarian activists in the Sixties. Whatever the individual reactions, this is a book that should not be ignored. International Journal of Reviews in Library and Information Science This collection of essays, written by library professionals who took an active role in the various rights movements, the war on poverty, and the campaign to end the Vietnam war, is the first serious exanination of the subject. The author offers a thoughtful review of the struggles of activists to achieve institutional change within their profession and the overall effect of these social movements on the outlook and professionalism of a new generation of librarians.
Table of Contents
Foreword
Introduction
Movements
Institutions
Groups and Programs
Epilogue Further Readings About the Authors
Appendices
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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