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Cultural aesthetics : Renaissance literature and the practice of social ornament /
Patricia Fumerton.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1991.
description
xii, 279 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226269523 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1991.
isbn
0226269523 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2759731
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-260) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
University Press Book News, March 1992
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Summaries
Main Description
A brilliant postmodern critique of Renaissance subjectivity, Cultural Aesthetics explores the simultaneous formation and fragmentation of aristocratic "selfhood" in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Patricia Fumerton situates the self within its sumptuous array of "trivial" arts--including the court literatures of chivalric romance, sonnet, and masque and the arts of architecture, miniature painting, stage design, and cuisine. Her integration of historicist and aesthetic perspectives makes this a provocative contribution to the vigorous field of Renaissance cultural studies.
Main Description
A brilliant postmodern critique of Renaissance subjectivity,Cultural Aestheticsexplores the simultaneous formation and fragmentation of aristocratic "selfhood" in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Patricia Fumerton situates the self within its sumptuous array of "trivial" arts--including the court literatures of chivalric romance, sonnet, and masque and the arts of architecture, miniature painting, stage design, and cuisine. Her integration of historicist and aesthetic perspectives makes this a provocative contribution to the vigorous field of Renaissance cultural studies.
Main Description
A brilliant postmodern critique of Renaissance subjectivity, Cultural Aesthetics explores the simultaneous formation and fragmentation of aristocratic "selfhood" in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Patricia Fumerton situates the self within its sumptuous array of "trivial" artsincluding the court literatures of chivalric romance, sonnet, and masque and the arts of architecture, miniature painting, stage design, and cuisine. Her integration of historicist and aesthetic perspectives makes this a provocative contribution to the vigorous field of Renaissance cultural studies.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: A Still Life: Clock, Jewel, Orange The Paradigm The Paradigm of Truncation: Culture as Fragment From the Fragmentary to the Peripheral and Ornamental Cultural Aesthetics
Exchanging Gifts: The Elizabethan Currency of Children and Romance The Ring of Gift The Ring of Elizabeth The Threat of the Irish The Poetics of Exchange: Spenser's Garden of Adonis At the Poem's Periphery: The Dedication Toward the Interior Cosmos
Secret Arts: Elizabethan Miniatures and Sonnets Publishing the Miniature: "In small volumes, in private matter" Hilliard's Secret Art of Limning Publishing the Sonnet: "Such Secret thoughts as fit not euery sight" Sidney's "Ground" of Poetry After Hilliard and Sidney: "Within the loue-limn'd tablet of mine heart"
Consuming the Void: Jacobean Banquets and Masques Rooms Apart of Sweet Conceits: Toward an Aesthetics of Detachment The Void of Self James's Banqueting House and the Masque Oberonin Perspective: The Annunciation of Self Tearing Down the Masque: Toward an Aesthetics of Consumerism
The Veil of Topicality: Trade and Ornament in Neptune's TriumphStrange Trade: Foreign Currency and the East India Company Eating Interests: Ormuz Dressing up Trade: Neptune's Triumph for the Return of AlbionCurtain Call: The Veil of Topicality
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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