Catalogue


Land, man, and the law : the disposal of crown lands in British Columbia, 1871-1913 /
Robert E. Cail.
imprint
Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press, [1974]
description
xv, 333 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0774800291
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press, [1974]
isbn
0774800291
general note
Originally presented as the author's thesis (M.A.), University of British Columbia, under title: Disposal of crown lands in British Columbia, 1871-1913.
catalogue key
2755282
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [319]-324) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
A through and unrivalled study of the disposal of crown lands inearly British Columbia, Land, Man, and the Law provides thebackground for such topics of current debate as timber and mineralrights and Indian Land claims. During the Hudson Bay Company's years, when trapping and tradingwere the only concerns of the few white occupants of British Columbia,land tenure was of little interest and few provisions were made for it.With the arrival of settlers, the officers of the colony were forced toact. An analysis of Governor James Douglas's policies, many of themhurriedly established when he was faced with an influx of gold miners,precedes a survey of the situation that existed when British Columbiaentered Confederation in 1871. Encouraging settlement, forestalling speculation, and securingrevenue were the three aims of Colonial and early Provinciallegislature. This book examines their success in the face of rapidexploitation of natural resources. Conflicts between the dominion andprovincial governments and between well-known public personalities werefrequent. The successes and failures of the men in office determinedthe future of the province -- for example, had early governments notretained rights to timber, forests would now be in private hands asmost of them are in the United States and the government would not beable to plan changes in the forms of tenure as it is now doing. The three chapters in which the author treats aboriginal land claimsare essential background for an understanding of the presentdebate.
Main Description
During the Hudson Bay Company#146;s years, when trapping and trading were the only concerns of the few white occupants of British Columbia, land tenure was of little interest and few provisions were made for it. With the arrival of settlers, the officers of the colony were forced to act. Encouraging settlement, forestalling speculation, and securing revenue were the three aims of Colonial and early Provincial legislature. This book examines their success in the face of rapid exploitation of natural resources.

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