Catalogue

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Economic and political change in Tunisia : from Bourguiba to Ben Ali /
Emma C. Murphy.
imprint
New York : St. Martin's Press in association with University of Durham, 1999.
description
xii, 285 p.
ISBN
0312221428 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : St. Martin's Press in association with University of Durham, 1999.
isbn
0312221428 (cloth)
catalogue key
2730152
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Emma C. Murphy is Lecturer in Middle East Politics at the Centre for Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, University of Durham, She gained her PhD from the University of Exeter in 1991 with a thesis on the political economy of Israeli-Palestinian relations and has also worked as a research fellow at Exeter's Research Unit for the Study of Economic Liberalisation (RUSEL). Her publications include Economic and Political Liberalization in the Middle East (edited with Tim Niblock).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-09:
This is a good chronicle of Tunisian economics and politics since independence, focusing on the "constitutional," though shady, transition from the Bourguiba to Ben Ali presidencies; internal politics; and economic policies and reform measures. Murphy (Univ. of Durham, UK) uses personal interviews and secondary sources to explain how the corporatist state, presumably representing a national consensus, was in contradiction with the authoritarian rule of both Bourguiba and Ben Ali. Attempts at political liberalization were mainly self-serving. Economic reform was instigated by the World Bank and IMF, though Tunisians believe otherwise. The author points more to failure than to success, however, and in the absence of an evaluative framework or model, she draws selectively on studies that support her conclusions regarding liberalization and reform. But how could Bourguiba and Ben Ali bring about democracy and freedom where education for democracy does not exist? How could they create a free enterprise market economy where the basic market institutions do not exist? And how could agricultural cooperatives, erroneously called collectives, succeed when the farmers knew little about cooperatives and had no say in their formation? The book would have benefited much from more depth and analysis. For comprehensive collections, upper-division undergraduate and up. E. H. Tuma; University of California, Davis
Reviews
Review Quotes
Emma Murphy's book is a particularly welcome addition to the small group of up-to-date studies of Tunisia. It provides an accessible introduction to Tunisia's modern poltical economy, focusing on the relationship between economic restructuring and political change since independence. Journal of North African Studies
Emma Murphy's book is a particularly welcome addition to the small group of up-to-date studies of Tunisia. It provides an accessible introduction to Tunisia's modern poltical economy, focusing on the relationship between economic restructuring and political change since independence.Journal of North African Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1999
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the processes of economic and political reform in Tunisia, placing the current policies of Zine el Abidine Ben Ali within their historical context. Emma Murphy develops a theoretical understanding of the relationship between economic liberalization and political change in the Arab world, developing the concept of the disarticulation of the corporatist state and concluding that, despite efforts at democratization, an authoritarian political system is a more likely successor in the era of economic transformation.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. viii
List of Abbreviationsp. x
Acknowledgementsp. xii
Introductionp. 1
Economic Liberalization and the State in the Developing World: From Corporatism to Authoritarianismp. 12
The Rise and Fall of the Corporatist State in Tunisia, 1956-1986p. 42
The Roots of Crisis: Economic Policy under Bourguiba, 1956-1987p. 80
Macroeconomic Stabilization and Early Economic Reform: The Seventh Development Plan, 1987-1991p. 103
The Consolidation of Structural Adjustment: The Eighth Development Plan, 1992-1996p. 132
The Politics of Reconciliation and Reform, 1987-1990p. 164
The Reassertion of the State, 1990-1997p. 193
The Disarticulation of Multi-Party Corporatism: State and Society under Ben Alip. 221
Notes and Referencesp. 245
Bibliographyp. 267
Indexp. 277
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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