Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Anglo-American relations and the Franco question, 1945-1955 /
Jill Edwards.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
description
xviii, 291 p.
ISBN
0198228716
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
isbn
0198228716
catalogue key
2686643
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A very interesting and enlightening book about a much neglected topic ... Jill Edwards's book, which builds on her previous work on Britain and the Spanish Civil War, is very helpful in clarifying the Western considerations about the role of Spain in the early Cold War
'A very interesting and enlightening book about a much neglected topic ... Jill Edwards's book, which builds on her previous work on Britain and the Spanish Civil War, is very helpful in clarifying the Western considerations about the role of Spain in the early Cold War.'Klaus Lanes, International Affairs, Vol 75, no 4, Oct 99
Capably weaves the diplomatic, political, and economic threads of Anglo-American relations with Franco's Spain from 1945 to 1955
Does shed additional light on Anglo-US relations in the early stages of the cold war
'Edwards has provided a richly docummented study, based on British and American archives and supported with both English and Spanish language secondary sources.'Sidney Aster, English Historical Review, Vol.115 No.461
'Perhaps the most notable of Edwards' contributions is to account for the reluctance of senior Western policy makers to acknowledge the inevitability of strategic association with Franco'American Historical Review
Professor Edwards' study fills a significant historiographical gap
'Professor Edwards' study fills a significant historiographical gap.'Diplomacy and Statecraft, vol. 12, no. 2
'Provides a convincing account of the complex background of politico-economic and strategic factors affecting Anglo-American approaches to the 'Franco question' in the ten years after World War II.'Diplomacy and Statecraft, vol. 12, no. 2
'There has recently been a bit of a 'mini-boom' in the publishing on the subject of the 'Spanish question' in international relations. Jill Edward's Anglo American Relations and the Franco Question, 1945-1955, is a welcome addition ... she provides some valuable historical lessons about theimpact of the U.S. National Security State on inter-allied relations and the early Cold War periphery.'David A Messenger, H-Net Book Review, Oct 2000.
'Provides a convincing account of the complex background of politico-economic and strategic factors affecting Anglo-American approaches to the 'Franco question' in the ten years after World War II.'Diplomacy & Statecraft, vol. 12, no. 2'Professor Edwards' study fills a significant historiographical gap.'Diplomacy & Statecraft, vol. 12, no. 2'Perhaps the most notable of Edwards' contributions is to account for the reluctance of senior Western policy makers to acknowledge the inevitability of strategic association with Franco'American Historical Review'There has recently been a bit of a 'mini-boom' in the publishing on the subject of the 'Spanish question' in international relations. Jill Edward's Anglo American Relations and the Franco Question, 1945-1955, is a welcome addition ... she provides some valuable historical lessons about the impact of the U.S. National Security State on inter-allied relations and the early Cold War periphery.'David A Messenger, H-Net Book Review, Oct 2000.'A very interesting and enlightening book about a much neglected topic ... Jill Edwards's book, which builds on her previous work on Britain and the Spanish Civil War, is very helpful in clarifying the Western considerations about the role of Spain in the early Cold War.'Klaus Lanes, International Affairs, Vol 75, no 4, Oct 99'Edwards has provided a richly docummented study, based on British and American archives and supported with both English and Spanish language secondary sources.'Sidney Aster, English Historical Review, Vol.115 No.461
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A study of British and American policy towards the Franco question from 1945 to 1955, this book examines the clash between the emerging dual system of the United Nations and the older system of balance of power, played out during the Cold War.
Long Description
This book examines how British and American governments grappled with the question of intervention or non-intervention in a pariah regime--Francoist Spain. Edwards details the clash between the emerging dual system of the United Nations and the older system of balance of power.
Long Description
This book examines the formulation of British and American policy between 1945 and 1955 towards one of the most hated regimes of this century. The Franco question though apparently not of the first importance in the evolution of Cold War policy, nevertheless haunted British and American governments during this period. It posed a problem which epitomises the difficulty of dealing with pariah regimes. As such it highlights for historians the attempts of these two governments to straddle the contradictions inherent in the emerging dual system of the United Nations, or internationalism, on the one hand, and the older system of balance of power, played out by the super powers as the Cold War. Set as it is in the domestic and international context, it also exemplifies the problems faced today by individual governments and by the United Nations in dealing with questions of intervention or non-intervention in distasteful regimes.
Main Description
This book examines the formulation of British and American policy between 1945 and 1955 towards one of the most hated regimes of this century. The Franco question though apparently not of the first importance in the evolution of Cold War policy, nevertheless haunted British and Americangovernments during this period. It posed a problem which epitomises the difficulty of dealing with pariah regimes. As such it highlights for historians the attempts of these two governments to straddle the contradictions inherent in the emerging dual system of the United Nations, orinternationalism, on the one hand, and the older system of balance of power, played out by the super powers as the Cold War. Set as it is in the domestic and international context, it also exemplifies the problems faced today by individual governments and by the United Nations in dealing withquestions of intervention or non-intervention in distasteful regimes.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. V
Introductionp. xiii
Pariahp. 1
The Scene is Setp. 3
The End of the Warp. 15
Peace and the New World Orderp. 30
San Francisco and Postdam the San Francisco Conferencep. 40
Shades of the Gestapop. 53
The Monarchist Optionp. 73
Spain and the Question of Aidp. 101
Aid and Democracyp. 103
The Senate, Spain, and the North Atlantic Treatyp. 126
Trouble at the United Nationsp. 137
The Cotton Lobby and the Spanish Loanp. 152
Battle Linesp. 175
Western Security and Spainp. 191
The European Contextp. 193
The 'tail of the Kite'p. 218
The Long Haul to the Accordsp. 234
The Accords and British Reactionp. 249
Conclusionp. 263
Select Bibliographyp. 267
Indexp. 277
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem