Catalogue


The 'Arabick' interest of the natural philosophers in seventeenth-century England /
edited by G.A. Russell.
imprint
Leiden ; New York : E.J. Brill, 1994.
description
x, 320 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004098887
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Leiden ; New York : E.J. Brill, 1994.
isbn
9004098887
catalogue key
268549
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...the volume represents the most complete account of its subject currently available in English..."Scott Mandelbrote, ISIS, 1995."The book as a whole is based on profound research, well written and edited, and presents its interesting, partly overlapping themes at the best level of the present-day knowledge...the rich information and thought brought into this volume make it a valuable and stimulating exercise in the history and sociology of knowledge."Lubos Kropacek, Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Arabisch-Islamischen Wissenschaften, 1994."L'ensemble des quatorze contributions, faites dans chaque cas par un spécialiste de la question traitée, est de qualité."Claude Gilliot, Revue des Sciences Philosophiques et Théologiques, 1995."...Russell has assembled a stimulating volume."François Charette, Historical Studies in the Physical and Biological Sciences, 1995."This invaluable source-book for the history of Semitics scholarship in Protestant Europe..."JFE, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, 1996."This picture of the European Renaissance - quite different from the one that is commonly seen - is enough reason to recommend this book very strongly to anyone who has an interest in the history of oriental studies, renaissance Europe, or even general intellectual history."George Saliba, Journal of the American Oriental Society, 1997.
'..".the volume represents the most complete account of its subject currently available in English...' Scott Mandelbrote, "ISIS, 1995. '"The book as a whole is based on profound research, well written and edited, and presents its interesting, partly overlapping themes at the best level of the present-day knowledge...the rich information and thought brought into this volume make it a valuable and stimulating exercise in the history and sociology of knowledge.' Lubos Kropacek, "Zeitschrift f]r Geschichte der Arabisch-Islamischen Wissenschaften, 1994. '"L'ensemble des quatorze contributions, faites dans chaque cas par un spicialiste de la question traitie, est de qualiti.' Claude Gilliot, "Revue des Sciences Philosophiques et Thiologiques, 1995. '..".Russell has assembled a stimulating volume.' Frangois Charette, "Historical Studies in the Physical and Biological Sciences, 1995. '"This invaluable source-book for the history of Semitics scholarship in Protestant Europe...' JFE, "Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, 1996. '"This picture of the European Renaissance - quite different from the one that is commonly seen - is enough reason to recommend this book very strongly to anyone who has an interest in the history of oriental studies, renaissance Europe, or even general intellectual history.' George Saliba, "Journal of the American Oriental Society, 1997.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The medieval concern with Arabic is well established. There was, however, a 'second wave' of Arabic interest in seventeenth-century Europe, which is not widely known. The essays in this volume reveal that, contrary to all expectation, the study of Arabic was pursued by a circle of natural philosophers, philologists and theologians in England in close contact with those on the Continent. Arabic was defended as an aid to biblical exegesis and as the key to a 'treasure house' of ancient knowledge. It led to the founding of Arabic chairs at Oxford and Cambridge Universities, endowed by archbishops and merchants. Arabic was taught, along with Hebrew, at Westminster school. Immense collections of Arabic manuscripts were acquired both privately and by libraries, such as the Bodleian at Oxford. They were sought after by natural philosophers in their research in observational astronomy or in the reconstruction of Greek mathematics. Arabic was also part of the Anglican interest in Eastern Churches. In addition to the earlier elegant editions of the Medici Press at Rome, bi-lingual texts, grammars, lexicons, and histories, were published by trained Arabists. Forgeries emerged based on Arabo-Latin alchemical texts. Arabic was included in the concern with a universal philosophical language. Arabic subjects featured extensively in the correspondence of the Royal Society. The impact of translated texts extended to the Quakers as well as to individual figures, such as Locke. In short, at a time when least expected, Arabic interest permeated all levels of English society, encompassing subjects which ranged from science, religion, and medicine, to typography and importing garden plants.Fourteenhistorians from different disciplines examine the extent and sources of this phenomenon. Ara
Description for Reader
All those interested in social and intellectual history, history of science and the Scientific Revolution, philosophy, religious studies, historians of Arabic/Islamic studies, historians of Arabic science, Hebrew, English social and institutional history, and libraries.
Main Description
The medieval concern with Arabic is well established. There was, however, a second wave of Arabic interest in seventeenth-century Europe, which is not widely known. The essays in this volume reveal that, contrary to all expectation, the study of Arabic was pursued by a circle of natural philosophers, philologists and theologians in England in close contact with those on the Continent. Arabic was defended as an aid to biblical exegesis and as the key to a treasure house of ancient knowledge. It led to the founding of Arabic chairs at Oxford and Cambridge Universities, endowed by archbishops and merchants. Arabic was taught, along with Hebrew, at Westminster school. Immense collections of Arabic manuscripts were acquired both privately and by libraries, such as the Bodleian at Oxford. They were sought after by natural philosophers in their research in observational astronomy or in the reconstruction of Greek mathematics. Arabic was also part of the Anglican interest in Eastern Churches. In addition to the earlier elegant editions of the Medici Press at Rome, bi-lingual texts, grammars, lexicons, and histories, were published by trained Arabists. Forgeries emerged based on Arabo-Latin alchemical texts. Arabic was included in the concern with a universal philosophical language. Arabic subjects featured extensively in the correspondence of the Royal Society. The impact of translated texts extended to the Quakers as well as to individual figures, such as Locke. In short, at a time when least expected, Arabic interest permeated all levels of English society, encompassing subjects which ranged from science, religion, and medicine, to typography and importing garden plants.Fourteen historians from different disciplines examine the extent and sources of this phenomenon. Arabic interest is shown to have been a significant aspect of the rise of Protestant intellectual tradition. It was also a major component of University reforms and of secular academic scholarship at Oxford and Cambridge. Thus the period also marks the institutionalisation of Arabic studies.By identifying many unexpected Arabick strands in the complex skein of seventeenth-century English concerns, this volume opens new lines of investigation and challenges some of the accepted historical interpretations of the period.
Long Description
The medieval concern with Arabic is well established. There was, however, a 'second wave' of Arabic interest in seventeenth-century Europe, which is not widely known. The essays in this volume reveal that, contrary to all expectation, the study of Arabic was pursued by a circle of natural philosophers, philologists and theologians in England in close contact with those on the Continent. Arabic was defended as an aid to biblical exegesis and as the key to a 'treasure house' of ancient knowledge. It led to the founding of Arabic chairs at Oxford and Cambridge Universities, endowed by archbishops and merchants. Arabic was taught, along with Hebrew, at Westminster school. Immense collections of Arabic manuscripts were acquired both privately and by libraries, such as the Bodleian at Oxford. They were sought after by natural philosophers in their research in observational astronomy or in the reconstruction of Greek mathematics. Arabic was also part of the Anglican interest in Eastern Churches. In addition to the earlier elegant editions of the Medici Press at Rome, bi-lingual texts, grammars, lexicons, and histories, were published by trained Arabists. Forgeries emerged based on Arabo-Latin alchemical texts. Arabic was included in the concern with a universal philosophical language. Arabic subjects featured extensively in the correspondence of the Royal Society. The impact of translated texts extended to the Quakers as well as to individual figures, such as Locke. In short, at a time when least expected, Arabic interest permeated all levels of English society, encompassing subjects which ranged from science, religion, and medicine, to typography and importing garden plants. Fourteenhistorians from different disciplines examine the extent and sources of this phenomenon. Arabic interest is shown to have been a significant aspect of the rise of Protestant intellectual tradition. It was also a major component of University reforms and of secular academic scholarship at Oxford and Cambridge. Thus the period also marks the institutionalisation of Arabic studies. By identifying many unexpected 'Arabick' strands in the complex skein of seventeenth-century English concerns, this volume opens new lines of investigation and challenges some of the accepted historical interpretations of the period.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
List of Illustrations
Introduction: The Seventeenth Century: The Age of 'Arabick'p. 1
Background to Arabic Studies in Seventeenth-Century Englandp. 20
The English Interest in the Arabic-Speaking Christiansp. 30
Arabists and Linguists in Seventeenth-Century Englandp. 54
Edmund Castell and His Lexicon Heptaglotton (1669)p. 70
The Medici Oriental Press (Rome 1584-1614) and the Impact of its Arabic Publications on Northern Europep. 88
Patrons and Professors: The Origins and Motives for the Endowment of University Chairs - in Particular the Laudian Professorship of Arabicp. 109
Arabic Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library: The Seventeenth-Century Collectionsp. 128
Arabick Learning in the Correspondence of the Royal Society 1660-1677p. 147
English Orientalists and Mathematical Astronomyp. 158
The Limited Lure of Arabic Mathematicsp. 215
The Impact of the Philosophus autodidactus: Pocockes, John Locke and the Society of Friendsp. 224
English Medical Writers and their Interest in Classical Arabic Medicine in the Seventeenth Centuryp. 266
Arabo-Latin Forgeries: The Case of the Summa perfectionisp. 278
Coronary Flowers and their 'Arabick' Backgroundp. 297
Indexp. 304
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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