Catalogue


Eisenhower's executive office /
Alfred Dick Sander.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1999.
description
212 p.
ISBN
0313309221 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1999.
isbn
0313309221 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2665827
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [203]-206) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Alfred Dick Sander is Professor Emeritus of History from Purdue University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-09:
Sander, author of A Staff for the President: the Executive Office, 1921-1952 (CH, Oct'89), here undertakes an organizational history of the office under Dwight D. Eisenhower. Sander's previous work enables him to engage in comparative analysis, and he concludes that "Eisenhower took an Executive Office of the President that was largely in shambles at the end of the Truman administration and turned it into a functioning organization." Sander examines changes within the White House office, the Council of Economic Advisers, the National Security Council, the Operations Coordinating Board, and the Bureau of the Budget, finding that only in the case of the Bureau of the Budget did Eisenhower fail to exploit an agency's potential. He avoids the pitfall of organizational studies that analyze skeletal structures without people; he shows how individuals shaped institutions. He credits Eisenhower with innovative contributions, including the establishment of the chief of staff and the revitalization of the Council of Economic Advisers. This cogent study demonstrates the complexity involved in reorganization, the varied sources of recommendations for change, and the pragmatic approach Eisenhower used in shaping the bureaucracy to provide the information needed for decision making. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. J. Dunar; University of Alabama in Huntsville
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œThis cogent study demonstrates the complexity involved in reorganization, the varied sources of recommendations fro change, and the pragmatic approach Eisenhower used in shaping the bureacracy to provide the information needed for decision making.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1999
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Summaries
Long Description
When Dwight Eisenhower ran for president he was so confident that he could organize the Executive Office more effectively than his predecessor that he made it an issue in the campaign of 1952. When he entered office he found that Congress had given him just two months to reorganize the Council of Economic Advisers or see it dissolved. The changes he made in the Council still form the basis of its organization. This book, based largely on original sources, attempts to analyze what Eisenhower did and did not do, and how well the mechanisms he installed worked.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
The White House Officep. 11
The Reorganization of the Council of Economic Advisersp. 37
Eisenhower and the Economic Councilp. 51
The Reorganization of the National Security Councilp. 71
The NSC in Operationp. 91
The Origin of the Operations Coordinating Boardp. 119
The Evolution of the Operations Coordinating Boardp. 137
The Bureau of the Budgetp. 155
Failed Plansp. 173
Under Attackp. 195
Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 207
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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