Catalogue


A most promising weed : a history of tobacco farming and labor in colonial Zimbabwe, 1890-1945 /
Steven C. Rubert.
imprint
Athens : Ohio University Center for International Studies, c1998.
description
xvi, 255 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0896802035 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : Ohio University Center for International Studies, c1998.
isbn
0896802035 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2653494
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 224-244) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-06-01:
Rubert's fluidly written study of the Southern Rhodesian tobacco industry and its workforce does for this economic sector what Charles van Onselen did for the mining industry more than two decades ago. Such a study is long overdue. A critical sector in southern Africa's regional economic network, Southern Rhodesian tobacco farms drew laborers from Northern and Southern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, and Mozambique. Basing his claims on extensive archival and oral research, Rubert examines the structure of this industry, the organization of the farms, and the work and lives of the labor force. Emphasizing workers' experiences and perspectives, he examines their negotiation of workloads, resistance to mistreatment, and role in creating compound life. Rubert's book also provides unique insight into the work and lives of African women on the tobacco farms. Written in a straightforward and accessible style, equipped with useful maps, tables, and photographs, the book makes an invaluable contribution to African economic, labor, and social history. It is highly recommended for upper-level undergraduates and above. E. S. Schmidt Loyola College in Maryland
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1999
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Summaries
Main Description
A Most Promising Weed examines the work experience, living conditions, and social relations of thousands of African men, women, and children on European-owned tobacco farms in colonial Zimbabwe from 1890 to 1945. Steven C. Rubert provides evidence that Africans were not passive in their responses to the penetration of European capitalism into Zimbabwe but, on the contrary, helped to shape both the work and living conditions they encountered as they entered wage employment. Beginning with a brief history of tobacco growing in Zimbabwe, this study focuses on the organization of workers' compounds and on the paid and unpaid labor performed by both women and children on those farms.
Unpaid Annotation
A Most Promising Weed examines the work experience, living conditions, and social relations of thousands of African men, women, and children on European-owned tobacco farms in colonial Zimbabwe from 1890 to 1945. Steven C. Rubert provides evidence that Africans were not passive in their responses to the penetration of European capitalism into Zimbabwe but, on the contrary, helped to shape both the work and living conditions they encountered as they entered wage employment.Beginning with a brief history of tobacco growing in Zimbabwe, this study focuses on the organization of workers' compounds and on the paid and unpaid labor performed by both women and children on those farms.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
List of Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
A Most Promising Weedp. 1
Salisbury Lends a Handp. 21
Farms and Farmersp. 42
Making the Gradep. 59
Labor and Disciplinep. 89
The Life of the Compoundp. 123
Quick and Nimble Fingersp. 148
Toward a Moral Economyp. 166
Conclusionp. 187
Notesp. 193
Bibliographyp. 224
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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