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Rousseau, Robespierre, and English Romanticism /
Gregory Dart.
imprint
New York ; Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
description
xi, 288 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521641004
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York ; Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
isbn
0521641004
catalogue key
2622324
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-10-01:
Dart examines the relationship between Rousseau's confessional writings and his political theory, and he challenges the common critical assumption that Mary Shelley's hero Victor Frankenstein is a revolutionary idealist whose attempt to create a new man reproduces the utopian impulse of 1789. Arguing that Dr. Frankenstein is fundamentally a Rousseauvian enthusiast rather than a skeptical philosphe, Dart calls for a reassessment of the influence of revolutionary Jacobism on the major writers of the period. The author challenges the view that the French Revolution was a progressive experiment in government that eventually resulted in terror by demonstrating how the major works of the Romantic period reflect the tension and contradiction of French republicanism. Dart reexamines both the dissent behind the French Revolution and the radical politics developed by Rousseau and mediated by Robespierre. Chapters 1 and 2 establish the relationship between political theory and autobiography during the period; subsequent chapters apply these critical assumptions to the works of such leading writers as William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Wordsworth, and William Hazlitt. Readers familiar with the critical works of Jerome McGann, David Simpson, Marilyn Butler, Alan Liu, and Marjorie Levinson will want to read this book for its unique insight into Rousseau and the period. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. M. S. Johnston Minnesota State University, Mankato
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...Dart's discussion of each of these writers is valuable..." Michael Wiley, The Wordsworth Circle
"This recent book by Gregory Dart is a well-informed and intelligently executed account of the impact of Rousseau's thought upon British romanticism... Rousseau, Robespirre, and Romanticism is a valuable, highly readable addition to romantic scholarship, a text that future analysts of the intersections of politics and literature in the age of romanticism would do well to read with care. Alertly attentive to the texts it reads, it sketches with considerable success the highly important process of Rousseau's assimilation into the political life of England in the post-revolutionary era." Stidies in Romanticism, 40 (Summer 01)
...unique insight into Rousseau and the period." Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1999
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Gregory Dart reopens the debate on Rousseau's influence on both the French Revolution and English Romanticism by examining the relationship between Rousseau's confessional writings and his political theory.
Description for Bookstore
This book re-examines RousseauÂ’s influence on the French Revolution and on English Romanticism, through his confessional writings and political theory, and their mediation in the speeches and actions of Robespierre. Gregory Dart shows how the writings of Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth and Hazlitt engage with the Jacobin tradition after the Terror.
Description for Bookstore
This book re-examines Rousseau's influence on the French Revolution and on English Romanticism, through his confessional writings and political theory, and their mediation in the speeches and actions of Robespierre. Gregory Dart shows how the writings of Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth and Hazlitt engage with the Jacobin tradition after the Terror.
Description for Library
This book re-opens the question of Rousseau's influence on the French Revolution and on English Romanticism, by examining the relationship between his confessional writings and his political theory. It argues that by looking at the way in which Rousseau's writings were mediated by the speeches and actions of Robespierre, we can gain a clearer and more concrete sense of the legacy he left to English writers. He shows how the writings of Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth and Hazlitt rehearse and reflect upon the Jacobin tradition in the aftermath of the Terror.
Main Description
This book reopens the question of Rousseau's influence on the French Revolution and on English Romanticism, by examining the relationship between his confessional writings and his political theory. Gregory Dart argues that by looking at the way in which Rousseau's writings were mediated by the speeches and actions of Robespierre, we can gain a clearer and more concrete sense of the legacy he left to English writers. He shows how the writings of Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth and Hazlitt rehearse and reflect upon the Jacobin tradition in the aftermath of the Terror.
Main Description
This book re-opens the question of Rousseau's influence on the French Revolution and on English Romanticism, by examining the relationship between his confessional writings and his political theory. Gregory Dart argues that by looking at the way in which Rousseau's writings were mediated by the speeches and actions of the French Jacobin statesman Maximilien Robespierre, we can gain a clearer and more concrete sense of the legacy he left to English writers. He shows how the writings of William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Wordsworth and William Hazlitt rehearse and reflect upon the Jacobin tradition in the aftermath of the French revolutionary Terror.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Despotism of liberty: Robespierre and the illusion of politics
The politics of confession in Rousseau and Robespierre
Chivalry, justice and the law in William Godwin's Caleb Williams
'The Prometheus of Sentiment': Rousseau, Wollstonecraft and aesthetic education
Strangling the infant Hercules: Malthus and the population controversy
'The virtue of one paramount mind': Wordsworth and the politics of the mountain
'Sour Jacobinism': William Hazlitt and the resistance to reform
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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