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Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright : the poetics and politics of modernism /
[M. Lynn Weiss].
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c1998.
description
xiii, 150 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1578061008 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c1998.
isbn
1578061008 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2606680
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [139]-144) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-07-01:
Weiss's book operates in at least three fields: theory of modernism, black studies, and Gertrude Stein explication. Weiss (Washington Univ.) handles the modernism per se rather cursorily, but his application of modernism to specific works compensates for that. The author treats parallels, comparisons, and contrasts using paired works by Wright and Stein. The emphasis is less on black or feminist than on expatriate pursuit of identity-in-writing. Stein's Paris France is paired with Wright's Pagan Spain; her Everybody's Autobiography with his Black Power; her Lectures in America with his White Man, Listen. The parallels are sometimes startling and always informative. Weiss's approach to Wright is more biographical and detailed than his approach to Stein, whom he treats more theoretically and generally. The study is nonetheless valuable on both poets, for the general reader or beginning undergraduate more than for the advanced student or specialist. A useful addition to undergraduate collections. J. N. Igo Jr. San Antonio College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1999
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Summaries
Main Description
After the Second World War Gertrude Stein asked a friend's support in securing a visa for Richard Wright to visit Paris. "I've got to help him, she said. You see, we are both members of a minority group." The brief, little-noted friendship of Stein and Wright began in 1945 with a letter. Over the next fifteen months, the two kept up a lively correspondence which culminated in Wright's visit to Paris in May 1946 and ended with Stein's death a few months later. Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright began their careers as marginals within marginalized groups, and their desire to live peacefully in unorthodox marriages led them away from America and into permanent exile in France. Still the obvious differences between them-in class, ethnic and racial origins, and in artistic expression-beg the question: What was there to talk about? This question opens a window onto each writer's meditations on the influence of racial, ethnic, national origins on the formation of identity in a modern and post-modern world. The intuitive and intellectual affinities between Stein and Wright are illuminated in several works of non-fiction. Stein's Paris Franceand Wright's Pagan Spainare meditations on expatriation and creativity. Their so-called homecoming narratives-Stein's Everybody's Autobiographyand Wright's Black Power--examine concepts of racial and national identity in a post-modernist world. Respectively in Lectures in Americaand White Man, Listen!Stein and Wright outline the ways in which the poetics and politics of modernism are inextricably bound. At the close of the twentieth century the meditations of Stein and Wright on the protean quality of individual identity and its artistic, social, and political expression explore the most prescient and pressing issues of our time and beyond. M. Lynn Weiss is an assistant professor of English and African-American literature at Washington University.
Main Description
After the Second World War Gertrude Stein asked a friend's support in securing a visa for Richard Wright to visit Paris."I've got to help him, she said. You see, we are both members of a minority group."The brief, little-noted friendship of Stein and Wright began in 1945 with a letter. Over the next fifteen months, the two kept up a lively correspondence which culminated in Wright's visit to Paris in May 1946 and ended with Stein's death a few months later.Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright began their careers as marginals within marginalized groups, and their desire to live peacefully in unorthodox marriages led them away from America and into permanent exile in France. Still the obvious differences between them-in class, ethnic and racial origins, and in artistic expression-beg the question: What was there to talk about? This question opens a window onto each writer's meditations on the influence of racial, ethnic, national origins on the formation of identity in a modern and post-modern world.The intuitive and intellectual affinities between Stein and Wright are illuminated in several works of non-fiction. Stein'sParis Franceand Wright'sPagan Spainare meditations on expatriation and creativity. Their so-called homecoming narratives-Stein'sEverybody's Autobiographyand Wright'sBlack Power--examine concepts of racial and national identity in a post-modernist world. Respectively inLectures in AmericaandWhite Man, Listen!Stein and Wright outline the ways in which the poetics and politics of modernism are inextricably bound.At the close of the twentieth century the meditations of Stein and Wright on the protean quality of individual identity and its artistic, social, and political expression explore the most prescient and pressing issues of our time and beyond.M. Lynn Weiss is an assistant professor of English and African-American literature at Washington University.
Main Description
Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright began their careers as marginals within marginalized groups, and their desire to live peacefully in unorthodox marriages led them away from America and into permanent exile in France. Still, the obvious differences between them - in class, ethnic and racial origins, and in artistic expression - beg the question: What was there to talk about? This question opens a window onto each writer's meditations on the influence of racial, ethnic, and national origins on the formation of identity in a modern and post-modern world.
Main Description
The Stein-Wright connection and its meaning for American literature and literary history
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Two Livesp. 1
Innocents Abroad: Gertrude Stein's Paris France and Richard Wright's Pagan Spainp. 27
American Odysseyp. 51
Lecture Notesp. 97
Conclusionp. 129
Works Citedp. 139
Indexp. 145
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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