Catalogue


The quiet Reformation : magistrates and the emergence of Protestantism in Tudor Norwich /
Muriel C. McClendon.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 1999.
description
xii, 340 p. : maps ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0804735131 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 1999.
isbn
0804735131 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2591946
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [309]-327) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
By examining the unusual course of religious change in Tudor Norwich, this book significantly revises the study of both the Reformation and the history of religious toleration in England. It shows that though Norwich experienced a genuine and far-reaching reformation in the sixteenth century, even becoming a hub of Puritan activity in the Elizabethan era, it did so without the breakdown of community, habitual intolerance, and widespread persecution that has been the focus of recent scholarly studies of the period. Drawing on extensive and largely unexploited municipal archives, the author argues that the course and outcome of the Reformation in Norwich were shaped in important ways by the city's magistrates. She demonstrates that the magistrates, who were religiously divided themselves, practiced a de facto religious toleration throughout the sixteenth century. Although they endorsed each change in Tudor religious policy in a formal sense, they neglected to enforce conformity and to discipline religious dissidents in their jurisdiction. Instead, they acted to defuse local religious disputes without notifying Church or central government officials. They did not extend this de facto toleration out of respect for the beliefs of dissenters or any idea of religious diversity. Rather, they executed a political strategy to deflect outside attention from religious affairs in the city and thus keep civic authority in their own hands. In showing that conflict and persecution were not inescapable consequences of religious change in the sixteenth century, this book challenges the received assumption of historians about the implacability of religious conflict in Reformation England. It conclusively shows that religious coexistence was possible, and in Norwich, exercised for most of the Tudor period, over a full century before most historians have commonly traced its emergence.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-07-01:
McClendon's monograph joins those of Susan Brigden on London, Martha Skeeters on Bristol, and Laquita Higgs on Colchester as much-needed studies of the Reformation in an English urban context. McLendon is at pains to explain how the magistrates of Norwich, while themselves religiously divided, nevertheless demonstrated little enthusiasm for imposing uniformity or punishing nonconformists. Whether contending with "zely peple" during the Henrician era, negotiating with "Protestant rebels" during Kett's Rebellion, or enforcing Catholic orthodoxy during the Marian persecution, the town's leaders consistently avoided the savage penalties commonly meted out in London. They exhibited just as little zeal for ferreting out Catholic recusants during Elizabeth's reign. This de facto toleration stemmed not from any commitment to religious diversity but from the need to maintain authority. McLendon's analysis of the events surrounding Kett's Rebellion, which initially had little to do with religion, amply demonstrates the concern of the magistracy to preserve civic order and prevent interference in city affairs by the central government. Thus the "quiet Reformation" in Norwich succeeded in establishing a "distinction between private religious belief on the one hand, and public action and civic loyalty on the other." Graduate, faculty. D. R. Bisson Belmont University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
By examining the unusual course of religious change in Tudor Norwich, this book significantly revises the study of both the Reformation and the history of religious toleration in England. It shows that though Norwich experienced a genuine and far-reaching reformation in the sixteenth century, even becoming a hub of Puritan activity in the Elizabethan era, it did so without the breakdown of community, habitual intolerance, and widespread persecution that has been the focus of recent scholarly studies of the period. Drawing on extensive and largely unexploited municipal archives, the author argues that the course and outcome of the Reformation in Norwich were shaped in important ways by the city's magistrates. She demonstrates that the magistrates, who were religiously divided themselves, practiced a de factoreligious toleration throughout the sixteenth century. Although they endorsed each change in Tudor religious policy in a formal sense, they neglected to enforce conformity and to discipline religious dissidents in their jurisdiction. Instead, they acted to defuse local religious disputes without notifying Church or central government officials. They did not extend this de factotoleration out of respect for the beliefs of dissenters or any idea of religious diversity. Rather, they executed a political strategy to deflect outside attention from religious affairs in the city and thus keep civic authority in their own hands. In showing that conflict and persecution were not inescapable consequences of religious change in the sixteenth century, this book challenges the received assumption of historians about the implacability of religious conflict in Reformation England. It conclusively shows that religious coexistence was possible, and in Norwich, exercised for most of the Tudor period, over a full century before most historians have commonly traced its emergence.
Back Cover Copy
"The scholarship is first rate, the analysis thoughtful and penetrating, and the writing clear and crisp. McClendon nicely places her story about whether the English reformation gained its major impetus from 'below' or 'above.'. . . It is a book which will be one of the models in its field of early modern urban history."J. sears McGee, University of California, Santa Barbara
Back Cover Copy
"The scholarship is first rate, the analysis thoughtful and penetrating, and the writing clear and crisp. McClendon nicely places her story about whether the English reformation gained its major impetus from ‘below' or ‘above.'. . . It is a book which will be one of the models in its field of early modern urban history."--J. sears McGee, University of California, Santa Barbara
Table of Contents
Conventions and Abbreviations
Introduction: Religion, Politics and the Possibility of Toleration in the English Reformationp. 1
Feuds and Factions: Discord and Disruption in Pre-Reformation Norwichp. 37
Handling Heresies: The Emergence of Toleration in Henrician Norwichp. 61
Symbolism Without Saints: The Reinvention of Civic Ritualp. 88
Protestantism Without Purity: Confessional Division, Crisis and Toleration in Edwardian Norwichp. 111
The Quiet Restoration: Norwich and the Return of Catholicism Under Queen Maryp. 152
Fervor and Forbearance: Norwich Under the Elizabethan Settlementp. 191
Conclusion: Belief and Belonging - Civic Identity in Reformation Norwichp. 253
Aldermen in Office in 1524 and 1535p. 261
Aldermanic Wills Written 1530-January 1547p. 262
Aldermanic Wills Written During the Reign of Edward VIp. 264
Aldermanic Wills Written During the Reign of Maryp. 265
Aldermen Who Died During the 1558-59 Influenza Epidemicp. 266
Offenses Punished in the Mayor's Court, 1540-41 to 1580-81p. 267
Notesp. 273
Bibliographyp. 309
Indexp. 329
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem