Catalogue


From suffrage to internationalism : the political evolution of three British feminists, 1908-1939 /
Beryl Haslam.
imprint
New York : P. Lang, c1999.
description
xxvi, 250 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0820425664 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : P. Lang, c1999.
isbn
0820425664 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2580774
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [217]-234) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Beryl Haslam is working with the Bertrand Russell Editorial Project at McMaster University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-09:
Haslam's work is a study of three prominent British feminists: Kathleen Courtney, Catherine Marshall, and Helena Swanwick. All three held high positions in the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, were democratic suffragists who sought to link feminism with the Labour Party, and resigned their NUWSS positions in 1915 in protest against its support for the government's war policy. They then worked to bring the war to an early end by a negotiated peace and became leaders of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Like many antiwar members of the Liberal Party, they joined the Labour Party at the end of the war but were greeted with suspicion by Labour's women leaders, who feared their feminism would introduce gender conflict into the party. Haslam, a member of the Bertrand Russell Editorial Project at McMaster University, is especially well informed on their contributions to the postwar peace movement. In contrast to studies that have stressed the feminist basis of the women's peace campaign (e.g., Jill Liddington's The Long Road to Greenham, CH, Dec'90), Haslam views them as part of a liberal internationalist movement. Upper-division undergraduates and above. H. L. Smith; University of Houston--Victoria
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1999
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The British feminists Kathleen Courtney, Catherine Marshall, and Helena Swanwick played leading roles in two of the most significant movements of the twentieth century: the fight for the emancipation of women and the struggle for peace and justice among nations. This book describes the developing political consciousness of these women and demonstrates how they helped to organize British women to lobby for their enfranchisement during the Edwardian and prewar periods and how, throughout the Great War, they defended civil liberties and campaigned for a negotiated peace and a system of international government. After the war, they were dismayed by the failure of the Treaty of Versailles to implement the principles of Wilsonian internationalism and joined with others to educate the public in these principles as a means of securing a permanent peace. This book documents how they worked for revision of the peace treaty, disarmament, and a strong League of Nations. The author argues that throughout their careers, the ideas and activism of these women were guided by a belief in liberty, equality and justice, as well as the necessity of applying reason to gender relations and international politics.
Unpaid Annotation
The British feminists Kathleen Courtney, Catherine Marshall, & Helena Swanwick played leading roles in two of the most significant movements of the twentieth century: the fight for the emancipation of women & the struggle for peace & justice among nations. This book describes the developing political consciousness of these women & demonstrates how they helped to organize British women to lobby for their enfranchisement during the Edwardian & prewar periods & how, throughout the Great War, they defended civil liberties & campaigned for a negotiated peace & a system of international government. After the war, they were dismayed by the failure of the Treaty of Versailles to implement the principles of Wilsonian internationalism & joined with others to educate the public in these principles as a means of securing a permanent peace. This book documents how they worked for revision of the peace treaty, disarmament, & a strong League of Nations. The author argues that throughout their careers, the ideas & activism of these women were guided by a belief in liberty, equality & justice, as well as the necessity of applying reason to gender relations & international politics.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Abbreviationsp. xi
Illustrationsp. xiii
Introductionp. xvii
The Edwardian Legacy: 1908-1914p. 1
Defining a Minority: August 1914-April 1917p. 40
"Patriotism Is Not Enough": 1916-1918p. 84
New World Order for Old? Reconstruction 1918-1923p. 130
Hopes of Peace Betrayedp. 173
Conclusionp. 211
Bibliographyp. 217
Indexp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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