Catalogue


Interracial justice : conflict and reconciliation in post-civil rights America /
Eric K. Yamamoto.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c1999.
description
xi, 330 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0814796745 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c1999.
isbn
0814796745 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2573406
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 279-324) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-09:
How can interracial conflicts be resolved? This carefully crafted study demonstrates that a solution requires multiple disciplines, case specificity, and an understanding of underlying conditions. Yamamoto emphasizes several major points: conflicts are not just black-white issues; Anglo control and institutional discrimination continue; ethnic groups act as oppressors and victims simultaneously. The case studies are the best part of this book. Readers are presented with a conflict between Chinese and African Americans over a desegregation order in a California high school. Both groups have legitimate grievances. Additional cases cover rapprochement among native Hawaiians, Asian Americans, and the United Church of Christ; the Truth and Reconciliation Committee in South Africa; and a dispute between African and Asian Americans in a hat shop. Yamamoto shows the layers of work necessary for enduring solutions: research to obtain the meanings from multiple constituencies; verbal apologies to save face and obtain catharsis; and changing institutional structures, usually requiring reparations. Many efforts fail, e.g., the insincere apologies of Ice Cube for "Black Korea" or de Klerk regarding apartheid. Highly recommended for its multilevel approach plus readability, this book could be enhanced only by a list of groups and projects working on interracial justice. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. D. Borchert; Lake Erie College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Yamamoto's analysis offers an important insight: A group can simultaneously be oppressed by others more powerful than it and also oppress others less powerful. . . . A pragmatic model for how interracial justice may someday be real." --The Hawaii Herald "A voice of reason, wisdom and compassion, Eric Yamamoto brings rich practical experience and analytic insight to the crucial subject of healing and reconciliation between groups divided by histories of oppression and mistreatment. This book is vital reading for anyone interested in creating a just world. --Martha Minow, Harvard Law School, Author of Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History after Genocide "A stunningly original and moving work that dramatically expands the national dialogue on race. . . . Yamamoto presents a multidisciplinary, praxis-oriented approach to confronting conflict among communities of color. He provides us with the concepts, the methods, and the language to understand and grapple with the messy nature of reconciliation between racialized groups. His vision of interracial justice is compelling, inspiring, and essential to averting the fire next time." --Michael Omi, University of California, Berkeley "Remarkable. A must read for all activists." --Yuri Kochiyama "Inspiring and energizing, disturbing and challenging, informative and inquisitive, Interracial Justice is a thoroughly researched, even ground-breaking, tour de force." --Berta Esperanza Hernndez-Truyol, St. John's University
"Remarkable. A must read for all activists." - Yuri Kochiyama
"We desperately need to put aside false information about immigrants, to see them as we see ourselves with honesty and compassion. This book gives powerful meaning to the slogan 'No Human Being is Illegal.' I hope it will be widely read." - Howard Zinn
"Yamamoto's analysis offers an important insight: A group can simultaneously be oppressed by others more powerful than it and also oppress others less powerful. . . . A pragmatic model for how interracial justice may someday be real."
"Yamamoto's analysis offers an important insight: A group can simultaneously be oppressed by others more powerful than it and also oppress others less powerful. . . . A pragmatic model for how interracial justice may someday be real." - The Hawaii Herald
"Yamamoto's analysis offers an important insight: A group can simultaneously be oppressed by others more powerful than it and also oppress others less powerful. . . . A pragmatic model for how interracial justice may someday be real." -The Hawaii Herald
"Inspiring and energizing, disturbing and challenging, informative and inquisitive, Interracial Justice is a thoroughly researched, even ground-breaking, tour de force."
"Inspiring and energizing, disturbing and challenging, informative and inquisitive, Interracial Justice is a thoroughly researched, even ground-breaking, tour de force." - Berta Esperanza Hern ndez-Truyol, St. John's University
"Inspiring and energizing, disturbing and challenging, informative and inquisitive, Interracial Justice is a thoroughly researched, even ground-breaking, tour de force." -Berta Esperanza Hernández-Truyol,St. John's University
"Inspiring and energizing, disturbing and challenging, informative and inquisitive,Interracial Justiceis a thoroughly researched, even ground-breaking, tour de force." - Berta Esperanza Hernández-Truyol, St. John's University
"Remarkable. A must read for all activists."
"Guskin and Wilson have written an excellent book about immigration politics, a very complex subject, in an accessible and provocative way. They use a question and answer format, which allows them to directly address some of the most heated issues in this national debate. They've done a great job of identifying these hot-button points, and go about undoing the stereotypes, misinformation and prejudice that paralyze rational thought about immigration policy. In the process, they break down complex sets of ideas into their component pieces, giving each one its own question. This book is a great reality check, a good teaching tool, and a powerful weapon against racism." - David Bacon, Photojournalist and trade unionist, author of Communities Without Borders: Images and Voices from the World of Migration
"In 2006, foreign nationals led the largest protests in the nation's history. As the immigrant rights movement grows in size and energy, we need quick facts and deep history. This encyclopedic book gives us both. Readers move in rapid fire from sanctuary and legalization to guestworker programs, raids and deportations. The argument is easy to follow, for families struggling to stay together and activists of all walks who are struggling to expose the issues." - Aarti Shahani, co-founder, Families for Freedom
"A voice of reason, wisdom and compassion, Eric Yamamoto brings rich practical experience and analytic insight to the crucial subject of healing and reconciliation between groups divided by histories of oppression and mistreatment. This book is vital reading for anyone interested in creating a just world." - Martha Minow, Harvard Law School, author ofBetween Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History after Genocide
"A voice of reason, wisdom and compassion, Eric Yamamoto brings rich practical experience and analytic insight to the crucial subject of healing and reconciliation between groups divided by histories of oppression and mistreatment. This book is vital reading for anyone interested in creating a just world." - Martha Minow, Harvard Law School, author of Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History after Genocide
"A stunningly original and moving work that dramatically expands the national dialogue on race. . . . Yamamoto presents a multidisciplinary, praxis-oriented approach to confronting conflict among communities of color. He provides us with the concepts, the methods, and the language to understand and grapple with the messy nature of reconciliation between racialized groups. His vision of interracial justice is compelling, inspiring, and essential to averting the fire next time."
"A stunningly original and moving work that dramatically expands the national dialogue on race. . . . Yamamoto presents a multidisciplinary, praxis-oriented approach to confronting conflict among communities of color. He provides us with the concepts, the methods, and the language to understand and grapple with the messy nature of reconciliation between racialized groups. His vision of interracial justice is compelling, inspiring, and essential to averting the fire next time." - Michael Omi, University of California, Berkeley
"A voice of reason, wisdom and compassion, Eric Yamamoto brings rich practical experience and analytic insight to the crucial subject of healing and reconciliation between groups divided by histories of oppression and mistreatment. This book is vital reading for anyone interested in creating a just world."
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The United States in the twenty-first century will be a nation of so-called minorities. Shifts in the composition of the American populace necessitate a radical change in the ways we as a nation think about race relations, identity, and racial justice.Once dominated by black-white relations, discussions of race are increasingly informed by an awareness of strife among nonwhite racial groups. While white influence remains important in nonwhite racial conflict, the time has come for acknowledgment of ways communities of color sometimes clash, and their struggles to heal the resulting wounds and forge strong alliances.Melding race history, legal theory, theology, social psychology, and anecdotes, Eric K. Yamamoto offers a fresh look at race and responsibility. He tells tales of explosive conflicts and halting conciliatory efforts between African Americans and Korean and Vietnamese immigrant shop owners in Los Angeles and New Orleans. He also paints a fascinating picture of South Africa's controversial Truth and Reconciliation Commission as well as a pathbreaking Asian American apology to Native Hawaiians for complicity in their oppression. An incisive and original work by a highly respected scholar, Interracial Justice greatly advances our understanding of conflict and healing through justice in multiracial America.
Main Description
The United States in the twenty-first century will be a nation of so-called minorities. Shifts in the composition of the American populace necessitate a radical change in the ways we as a nation think about race relations, identity, and racial justice.Once dominated by black-white relations, discussions of race are increasingly informed by an awareness of strife among nonwhite racial groups. While white influence remains important in nonwhite racial conflict, the time has come for acknowledgment of ways communities of color sometimes clash, and their struggles to heal the resulting wounds and forge strong alliances.Melding race history, legal theory, theology, social psychology, and anecdotes, Eric K. Yamamoto offers a fresh look at race and responsibility. He tells tales of explosive conflicts and halting conciliatory efforts between African Americans and Korean and Vietnamese immigrant shop owners in Los Angeles and New Orleans. He also paints a fascinating picture of South Africa's controversial Truth and Reconciliation Commission as well as a pathbreaking Asian American apology to Native Hawaiians for complicity in their oppression. An incisive and original work by a highly respected scholar,Interracial Justicegreatly advances our understanding of conflict and healing through justice in multiracial America.
Main Description
The United States in the twenty-first century will be a nation of so-called minorities. Shifts in the composition of the American populace necessitate a radical change in the ways we as a nation think about race relations, identity, and racial justice. Once dominated by black-white relations, discussions of race are increasingly informed by an awareness of strife among nonwhite racial groups. While white influence remains important in nonwhite racial conflict, the time has come for acknowledgment of ways communities of color sometimes clash, and their struggles to heal the resulting wounds and forge strong alliances. Melding race history, legal theory, theology, social psychology, and anecdotes, Eric K. Yamamoto offers a fresh look at race and responsibility. He tells tales of explosive conflicts and halting conciliatory efforts between African Americans and Korean and Vietnamese immigrant shop owners in Los Angeles and New Orleans. He also paints a fascinating picture of South Africa's controversial Truth and Reconciliation Commission as well as a pathbreaking Asian American apology to Native Hawaiians for complicity in their oppression. An incisive and original work by a highly respected scholar, Interracial Justice greatly advances our understanding of conflict and healing through justice in multiracial America.
Main Description
In the spring of 2006, millions of immigrants and supporters organized in cities and small towns across the United States to defend their rights following the passage of HR4437, a bill designed to punish unauthorized immigrants. In an unprecedented show of force, tens of thousands of workers marched out of meatpacking plants, factories, restaurants, landscape businesses and stores, while studentsmany of them the US-born children of immigrantsstaged school walkouts. Thousands also observed a one-day national consumer boycott to demonstrate the economic power of immigrant communities. The spring 2006 mobilizationsand the ensuing backlash from anti-immigrant sectorspushed the topic of immigration to the front and center of U.S. politics. Polls show the public increasingly divided, with the debate framed as a choice between "deport them all" and "give everyone amnesty." But dialogue is possible when we dig deeper. Why are people leaving their homes? Why are they coming here? What is the impact of our current enforcement policies? What kinds of alternatives exist? Backed with a wide range of cited sources, The Politics of Immigration tackles questions and concerns about immigration with compelling arguments and hard facts, laid out in straightforward language and an accessible question-and-answer format. For immigrants and supporters, the book is an effective tool to confront common myths and misinformation. For teachers, it provides a useful framework on the current debate, and ample opportunities for students to reach out and explore the intersecting issues. Those who believe immigrants steal jobs from citizens, drive down wages, strain public services, and threaten our culture will find such assumptions challenged here, while people who are undecided about immigration will find the solid data and clear reasoning they need to develop an informed opinion.
Main Description
A voice of reason, wisdom and compassion, Eric Yamamoto brings rich practical experience and analytic insight to the crucial subject of healing and reconciliation between groups divided by histories of oppression and mistreatment. This book is vital reading for anyone interested in creating a just world.--Martha Minow, Harvard Law School, Author of Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History after GenocideA stunningly original and moving work that dramatically expands the national dialogue on race.... Yamamoto presents a multidisciplinary, praxis-oriented approach to confronting conflict among communities of color. He provides us with the concepts, the methods, and the language to understand and grapple with the messy nature of reconciliation between racialized groups. His vision of interracial justice is compelling, inspiring, and essential to averting the fire next time.--Michael Omi, University of California, BerkeleyRemarkable. A must read for all activists.--Yuri KochiyamaYamamoto's analysis offers an important insight: A group can simultaneously be oppressed by others more powerful than it and also oppress others less powerful.... A pragmatic model for how interracial justice may someday be real.--The Hawaii HeraldInspiring and energizing, disturbing and challenging, informative and inquisitive, Interracial Justice is a thoroughly researched, even ground-breaking, tour de force.ùBerta Esperanza Hernßndez-Truyol, St. John's UniversityThe United States in the twenty-first century will be a nation of so-called minorities. Shifts in the composition of the American populace necessitate a radical change in the ways we as a nation think about race relations, identity, and racial justice.Once dominated by black-white relations, discussions of race are increasingly informed by an awareness of strife among nonwhite racial groups. While white influence remains important in nonwhite racial conflict, the time has come for acknowledgment of ways communities of color sometimes clash, and their struggles to heal the resulting wounds and forge strong alliances.Melding race history, legal theory, theology, social psychology, and anecdotes, Eric K. Yamamoto offers a fresh look at race and responsibility. He tells tales of explosive conflicts and halting conciliatory efforts between African Americans and Korean and Vietnamese immigrant shop owners in Los Angeles and New Orleans. He also paints a fascinating picture of South Africa's controversial Truth and Reconciliation Commission as well as a pathbreaking Asian American apology to Native Hawaiians for complicity in their oppression. An incisive and original work by a highly respected scholar, Interracial Justice greatly advances our understanding of conflict and healing through justice in multiracial America.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Prologuep. 1
Introductionp. 7
"Can We All Get Along?": Justice Grievances among Communities of Colorp. 23
"When Sorry Isn't Enough": A Worldwide Trend of Race Apologiesp. 50
Asian Americans and Native Hawaiians: Apology and Redressp. 60
"It's Sanitized, Guiltless Racism": Race, Culture, and Grievancep. 81
"Who's Hurting Whom?": Reframing Racial Group Agency and Responsibilityp. 98
Race Praxis: A Developing Theory of Racial Justice Practicep. 128
Interracial Healing: Multidisciplinary Approachesp. 153
"Facing History, Facing Ourselves": Interracial Justicep. 172
Apology and Reparations for Native Hawaiiansp. 210
The Hat Shop Controversy: African Americans and Asian Americans in Los Angelesp. 236
Truth and Reconciliation: South Africa 1998p. 254
Epiloguep. 276
Notesp. 279
Indexp. 325
About the Authorp. 330
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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