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Respectable lives : social standing in rural New Zealand /
Elvin Hatch.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
description
vii, 214 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520074726 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
isbn
0520074726 (cloth)
catalogue key
2565553
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Elvin Hatch is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Trees of the California Landscapecombines in a single volume just about everything landscape design professionals or home gardeners need to know about California trees. This excellent reference book/field guide will be particularly welcomed by landscape architects, as it pulls together a range of information about trees currently scattered throughout a number of older reference works. The heart of the book is a compendium of trees and includes essential information about individual species. The supporting sections on taxonomy, climate, range of native forest types, applications and special use lists contain a wealth of useful information."--Heath Schenker, Professor and Chair, Department of Landscape Architecture, UC Davis
Flap Copy
" Trees of the California Landscapecombines in a single volume just about everything landscape design professionals or home gardeners need to know about California trees. This excellent reference book/field guide will be particularly welcomed by landscape architects, as it pulls together a range of information about trees currently scattered throughout a number of older reference works. The heart of the book is a compendium of trees and includes essential information about individual species. The supporting sections on taxonomy, climate, range of native forest types, applications and special use lists contain a wealth of useful information."--Heath Schenker, Professor and Chair, Department of Landscape Architecture, UC Davis
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-09:
Hatch (University of California, Santa Barbara) argues that there are no universal or objective standards of social standing, but rather, that one's place in the social hierarchy is based on culturally variable elements of prestige. To prove his point, he examines the social hierarchy of a rural community in New Zealand and the criteria used by local informants to judge an individual's place in this structure. By comparing his findings to the results of earlier research in rural California, Hatch shows that "universal" factors such as wealth are in fact defined quite differently by the two communities, despite similar ethnic and occupational backgrounds. With a minimum of jargon Hatch has created a nice introduction to comparative social science as well as a contribution to the theory of his field. S. P. Reynolds; Southern Oregon State College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1992
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Summaries
Long Description
Where do we get our notions of social hierarchy and personal worth? What underlies our beliefs about the goals worth aiming for, the persons we hope to become? Elvin Hatch addresses these questions in his ethnography of a small New Zealand farming community, articulating the cultural system beneath the social hierarchy. Hatch describes a cultural theory of social hierarchy that defines not only the local system of social rank, but personhood as well. Because people define respectability differently, a crucial part of Hatch's approach is to examine how these differences are worked out over time. The concept of occupation is central to Hatch's analysis, since the work that people do provides the skeletal framework of the hierarchical order. He focuses in particular on sheep farming and compares his New Zealand community with one in California. Wealth and respectability are defined differently in the two places, with the result that California landholders perceive a social hierarchy different from the New Zealanders'. Thus the distinctive "shape" that characterizes the hierarchy among these New Zealand landholders and their conceptions of self reflect the distinctive cultural theory by which they live.
Unpaid Annotation
Where do we get our notions of social hierarchy and personal worth? What underlies our beliefs about the goals worth aiming for, the persons we hope to become? Elvin Hatch addresses these questions in his ethnography of a small New Zealand farming community, articulating the cultural system beneath the social hierarchy.Hatch describes a cultural theory of social hierarchy that defines not only the local system of social rank, but personhood as well. Because people define respectability differently, a crucial part of Hatch's approach is to examine how these differences are worked out over time.The concept of occupation is central to Hatch's analysis, since the work that people do provides the skeletal framework of the hierarchical order. He focuses in particular on sheep farming and compares his New Zealand community with one in California. Wealth and respectability are defined differently in the two places, with the result that California landholders perceive a social hierarchy differentfrom the New Zealanders'. Thus the distinctive "shape" that characterizes the hierarchy among these New Zealand landholders and their conceptions of self reflect the distinctive cultural theory by which they live.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
The Historical Patternp. 15
The Occupational Systemp. 44
The Conceptual Basis of Occupational Standingp. 70
The Criterion of Wealth Among Farmersp. 91
The Criterion of Farming Abilityp. 110
The Criterion of Refinement: The 1920sp. 132
The Criterion of Refinement: After World War IIp. 159
Conclusionp. 180
Notesp. 189
Bibliographyp. 201
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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