Catalogue


The foundations of American citizenship : liberalism, the Constitution, and civic virtue /
Richard C. Sinopoli.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1992.
description
215 p.
ISBN
0195070674 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1992.
isbn
0195070674 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2557875
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-01:
Were the framers of the US Constitution Lockean liberals or classical republicans? What about the anti-Federalists? Sinopoli (University of California at Davis) attempts to sort out these and other related questions. Drawing upon both primary and secondary works, Sinopoli craftily weaves an argument demonstrating that the questions above are poorly framed. Furthermore, he maintains that the framers and anti-Federalists were, to some extent, both liberals and republicans; the disagreements of the late-18th century fell on the mix of those two philosophical traditions thought proper for the foundation and governance of the new American republic. Sinopoli offers more than just another, though excellent, critique of Locke and his influence on the political foundations of America. He also discusses, equally well, the Scottish connection with the American founding, including the influence of John Witherspoon, Francis Hutcheson, and especially Adam Smith, on political thinking concerned with the proper development of civic virtue, a concern for Federalists and anti-Federalists alike. A valuable book for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students. J. R. Pottenger; University of Alabama in Huntsville
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An important and interesting work of scholarship....A considerable contribution."--William and Mary Quarterly
"An important and interesting work of scholarship....A considerable contribution."--William and Mary Quarterly "A valuable book for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students."--Choice "The most original contribution of this study is its emphasis on the political psychology of citizenship."--Reviews in American History "A solid contribution to the literatures on liberalism and the founding period."--The Journal of American History
"An important and interesting work of scholarship....A considerable contribution."-- William and Mary Quarterly "A valuable book for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students."-- Choice "The most original contribution of this study is its emphasis on the political psychology of citizenship."-- Reviews in American History "A solid contribution to the literatures on liberalism and the founding period."-- The Journal of American History
"A solid contribution to the literatures on liberalism and the founding period."--The Journal of American History
"A valuable book for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students."--Choice
"The most original contribution of this study is its emphasis on the political psychology of citizenship."--Reviews in American History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Richard Sinopoli explores the political world view of the individuals who made the American Revolution, focusing on their conceptions of citizenship as expressed in the debates over the ratification of the 1787 Constitution.
Long Description
This study of exemplary writings from the debates over the ratification of the 1787 Constitution deals with the American constitutional founders' understandings of citizenship and civic virtue. Discussion of these debates is set in an analytical and historical context, addressing the rationales for and the nature of civic allegiance in liberal political regimes. Sinopoli analyzes the development of a distinctly liberal political psychology from its origins in John Locke, Adam Smith, and David Hume through the American founding and traces its implications for the current American polity.
Main Description
This study of exemplary writings from the debates over the ratification of the 1787 Constitution deals with the American constitutional founders' understandings of citizenship and civic virtue. Discussion of these debates is set in an analytical and historical context, addressing therationales for and the nature of civic allegiance in liberal political regimes. Sinopoli analyzes the development of a distinctly liberal political psychology from its origins in John Locke, Adam Smith, and David Hume through the American founding and traces its implications for the current Americanpolity.
Table of Contents
Introduction: the Constitutional Founders' Liberalism and Civic Virtuep. 3
Problems and Predecessorsp. 17
Liberal Community and Civic Virtue: an Analysisp. 19
John Locke: Acting on Natural Law Duties and the Problem of Civic Motivationsp. 39
The Psychology of Citizenship: the Scottish Connectionp. 53
The Constitutional Founders' Theories of Citizenshipp. 83
The Federalist: Liberal Commitmentsp. 85
Publius's Liberalism and Civic Virtuep. 101
The Anti-Federalists and Civic Virtuep. 129
Conclusion: American Citizenship Viewed from the Foundingp. 157
Appendix: a Note on Methodp. 173
Notesp. 179
Indexp. 211
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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