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The Cold War comes to Main Street : America in 1950 /
Lisle A. Rose.
imprint
Lawrence, KS : University Press of Kansas, 1999.
description
x, 404 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0700609288 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lawrence, KS : University Press of Kansas, 1999.
isbn
0700609288 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2532194
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 371-386) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1998-12:
Author of The Ship That Held the Line, Naval Inst., 1995) and other titles, former State Department official Rose writes about the early history of the Cold War as perceived by "Main Street," the American public, rather than by government officials and politicians. Rose asserts that Americans correctly recognized Stalin's aggressive hostility toward the West. He regards 1950 (with the Korean War and McCarthyism) as a pivotal point when public confidence in the liberal consensus collapsed and was replaced by anti-Communist hysteria and fundamentalist conservatism aiming to dismantle the legacies of the New Deal. Rose discusses the battles between liberals and conservatives, the latter winning support from "Main Street" in conducting government assaults on the rights of individuals. This fine, well-argued narrative would have been even more provocative if it had included in-depth analyses connecting "Main Street" and the Cold War to organized labor and the Civil Rights movement. Recommended for academic and public libraries.‘Charles L. Lumpkins, Pennsylvania State Univ., State College (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1999-06-01:
Rose has written a provocative book that illuminates the 1950s. He contends that three major factors influenced and changed the US in 1950. The first of these was the development of a more powerful "super" nuclear bomb. Rose argues that the specter of possible nuclear confrontation with Russia, a war that could have ended the world as it was known, negatively affected American culture. The emergence of Senator Joe McCarthy and ensuing McCarthyism was the second significant cause of a downturn in the national mood. McCarthy's irresponsible charges, coupled with actual spy cases, led many Americans to conclude that something was very wrong in the country. Finally, the outbreak of war in Korea and all the grief resulting from that confrontation added more fuel to the uneasiness in the US. According to Rose, the American people lost their optimism and became tremendously disillusioned with President Truman because of the interplay of the above events. Is Rose correct? His argument is persuasive and his research is sound, but many will still challenge his contentions. In the end, readers will have to decide for themselves. All levels. A. Yarnell Montana State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, December 1998
Choice, June 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Revealing the interplay between foreign policy, domestic politics, and public opinion, this book argues that 1950 was a pivotal year for the USA. The author states that the convergence of Korea, McCarthy, and the Bomb wounded the nation.
Main Description
In 1950, Main Street America-restored by victories in a global war and hopeful for a prosperous and peaceful future-was abruptly traumatized. The sudden prospect of thermonuclear war with the Sovet Union, Senator Joseph McCarthys vicious anticommmunist crusade, and the beginning of the Korean War all combined to dampen the public mood. In the wake of these events, the Cold War invaded every home and convinced millions of Americans that the liberal establishment created by Franklin Roosevelt and sustained by Harry Truman had betrayed the public trust and placed the nation in mortal peril. Revealing the intense interplay between foreign policy, domestic politics, and public opinion, Lisle Rose argues that 1950 was a pivotal year for the nation. Thermonuclear terror brought "a clutching fear of mass death" to the forefront of public awareness, even as McCarthys zealous campaign to root out "subversives" destroyed a sense of national community forged in the Great Depression and World War II. The Korean War, with its dramatic oscillations between victory and defeat, put the finishing touches on the national mood of crisis and hysteria. Drawing upon recently available Russian and Chinese sources, Rose sheds much new light on the aggressive designs of Stalin, Mao, and North Koreas Kim Il Sung in East Asia and places the American reaction to the North Korean invasion in a new and more realistic context. Rose argues that the convergence of Korea, McCarthy, and the Bomb wounded the nation in ways from which weve never fully recovered. He suggests, in fact, that the convergence may have paved the way for our involvement in Vietnam and, by eroding public trust in and support for government, launched the ultra-Rights campaign to dismantle the foundations of modern American liberalism. Engagingly written, The Cold War Comes to Main Street is a sophisticated synthesis that cuts to the core of a half-century of postwar national paranoia. It calls into question the assumptions of several generations of scholars about foreign affairs and domestic policies and will force readers to reconsider their assumptions about just when-and how-the nation lost its sense of community, confidence, and civility.
Unpaid Annotation
Argues that 1950 was pivotal for America as the Cold War finally came home to roost & the convergence of Korea, McCarthy, & the Bomb created a debilitating atmosphere of fear & distrust from which we've never fully recovered.
Unpaid Annotation
In 1950, Main Street American was abruptly traumatized. The sudden prospect of thermonuclear war with the Soviet Union, Senator McCarthy's vicious anticommunist crusade, and the beginning of the Korean War all combined to dampen the public mood. The Cold War invaded every home. Rose maintains that 1950 was a pivotal year for the nation. He argues that the convergence of Korea, McCarthy, and the bomb wounded the nation in ways from which we've never fully recovered. Brimming with originality, this book makes readers look at the Cold War from a dozen different angles.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Liberalsp. 7
The Red Menacep. 22
Conservativesp. 39
The Bombp. 64
McCarthyismp. 117
The Guns of Summerp. 166
The Politics of Hysteriap. 207
Hubrisp. 223
Disasterp. 262
Epiloguep. 311
Notesp. 331
Bibliographyp. 371
Indexp. 387
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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