Catalogue

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Patronage and politics in the USSR /
John P. Willerton.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
description
xv, 305 p. ; 24 cm. --
ISBN
0521392888 (hard)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
isbn
0521392888 (hard)
catalogue key
2525425
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 283-288) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...scholarship doing what social science does best--using cautious, imaginative methods to establish as present and give some quantitative shape to phenomena which seem intuitively or experimentally to be true, but for which there is no systematic evidence....Willerton has done us real service by providing this careful documentaton of the ways in which that self-interest manifested tself in the tight confines of the Soviet system." Martha Brill Olcott, Slavic Review
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
In Patronage and Politics in the USSR, first published in 1991, Professor John Willerton offers major insights into the patronage networks that have dominated elite mobility, regime formation, and governance in the Soviet Union during the past twenty-five years.
Description for Bookstore
In Patronage and Politics in the USSR Professor John Willerton offers major insights into the patronage networks that have dominated elite mobility, regime formation, and governance in the Soviet Union during the past twenty-five years.
Main Description
How do Soviet politicans rise to power? How are conflicting political interests brought together as policies are developed? Historians and political scientists have long been absorbed by these questions, yet none has systematically examined the crucial role played by patron-client relations. In Patronage and Politics in the USSR Professor John Willerton offers major new insights into the patronage networks that have dominated elite mobility, regime formation and governance in the Soviet Union for the past twenty-five years. Using the career details of over two thousand national and regional officials, John Willerton traces the patron-client relations underlying recruitment, mobility and policy-making.
Main Description
How do Soviet politicians rise to power? How are national and regional regimes formed? How are conflicting political interests brought together as policies are developed in the Soviet Union? In Patronage and Politics in the USSR, first published in 1991, Professor John Willerton offers major insights into the patronage networks that have dominated elite mobility, regime formation, and governance in the Soviet Union during the past twenty-five years. Using the biographical and career details of over two thousand national leaders and regional officials in Azerbaijan and Lithuania, John Willerton traces the patron-client relations underlying recruitment, mobility, and policymaking. He explores the strategies of power consolidation and coalition building used by Soviet chief executives since 1964 as well as the institutional links and policy outcomes that have resulted from network politics. The author also assesses the manner and extent to which leaders in politically stable and less stable settings, spanning different national cultural contexts, have relied upon patronage networks to consolidate power and to govern. Finally, Professor Willerton explores how, in a period of dramatic change, patron-client networks may have given way to institutionalised interest groups and political parties.
Main Description
How do Soviet politicians rise to power? How are national and regional regimes formed? How are conflicting political interests brought together as policies are developed in the Soviet Union? In Patronage and Politics in the USSR Professor John Willerton offers major insights into the patronage networks that have dominated elite mobility, regime formation, and governance in the Soviet Union during the past twenty-five years. Using the biographical and career details of over two thousand national leaders and regional officials in Azerbaijan and Lithuania, John Willerton traces the patron-client relations underlying recruitment, mobility, and policymaking. He explores the strategies of power consolidation and coalition building used by Soviet chief executives since 1964 as well as the institutional links and policy outcomes that have resulted from network politics. The author also assesses the manner and extent to which leaders in politically stable and less stable settings, spanning different national cultural contexts, have relied upon patronage networks to consolidate power and to govern. Finally, Professor Willerton explores how, in a period of dramatic change, patron-client networks may have given way to institutionalised interest groups and political parties.
Main Description
How do Soviet politicians rise to power? How are national and regional regimes formed? How are conflicting political interests brought together as policies are developed in the Soviet Union? These questions have long absorbed historians and political scientists, yet none have systematically examined the crucial role played by patron-client relations. In Patronage and politics in the USSR Professor John Willerton offers major new insights into the patronage networks that have dominated elite mobility, regime formation, and governance in the Soviet Union during the past twenty-five years. Using the biographical and career details of over two thousand national leaders and regional officials in Azerbaidzhan and Lithuania, John Willerton traces the patron-client relations underlying recruitment, mobility, and policymaking. He explores the strategies of power consolidation and coalition building used by Soviet chief executives since 1964 as well as the institutional links and policy outcomes that have resulted from network politics. The author also assesses the manner and extent to which leaders in politically stable and less stable settings, spanning different national cultural contexts, have relied upon patronage networks to consolidate power and to govern. Finally, Professor Willerton explores how, in a period of dramatic change, patron-client networks may now be giving way to institutionalized interest groups and political parties.
Table of Contents
List of tables
Preface
Introduction
The elite, patronage, and Soviet politics
Networks and coaliation building in the Brezhnev period
Patronage and the Brezhnev policy program
Patronage, Gorbachev, and the period of reform
Patronage and regime formation in Lithuania
Azerbaidzhan and the Aliev network
The logic of patronage in changing societies
Appendix
Notes
Select bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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