Catalogue


Pioneers of the Black Atlantic : five slave narratives from the Enlightenment, 1772-1815 /
edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., William L. Andrews.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Civitas, c1998.
description
xiv, 439 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1887178988 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Civitas, c1998.
isbn
1887178988 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
2512306
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1998-12:
Presenting five autobiographies‘of John Jea, James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, John Marrant, Ottobah Cugoano, and Olaudah Equiano‘published in English between 1772 and 1815, this collection advances the conception of a sophisticated black Atlantic community of social and cultural Creoles related to Africa, America, and Europe. Edited (but not abridged) to facilitate contemporary reading, the five texts reveal early black writers sharing not merely sensibilities but also texts, themes, and figures in a discourse that created the connections for the sociopolitical groundwork of an African American literary tradition. Andrews (English, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) puts the texts in historical perspective in his preface, and the prolific Gates (African American studies, Harvard) gives them a literary context with a provocative introduction. More than a convenient collection, this work is important for the framework it offers and is highly recommended for collections in modern history, literature, and political protest.‘Thomas Davis, Arizona State Univ., Tempe (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, December 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In the eighteenth century, a small group of black men met the challenge of the Enlightenment by mastering the arts and sciences and writing themselves into history. The battle lines were clear--literacy stood as the ultimate measure of humanity to the white arbiters of Western culture. If blacks could succeed in this sphere, they would prove that African and European humanity were inseparable. Without a literary record, blacks seemed predestined for slavery.The small but dedicated group--now known as the Black Atlantic writers--who stepped forward to meet this challenge published their autobiographies in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They not only defied the popular opinion of the time that blacks were unfit for letters, but inaugurated the Black American and Black British literary traditions.While slave narratives are often excerpted and anthologized, they are rarely collected in their entirety. Pioneers of the Black Atlantic is the first anthology to include the complete texts of the five most important and influential narratives of the eighteenth century. Included here are the writings of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, John Marrant, Ottobah Cugoano, Olaudah Equiano, and John Jea.Their stories, resonant still in our racially divided world, are landmarks in the history of autobiography and human rights.
Main Description
In the eighteenth century, a small group of black men met the challenge of the Enlightenment by mastering the arts and sciences and writing themselves into history. The battle lines were clearliteracy stood as the ultimate measure of humanity to the white arbiters of Western culture. If blacks could succeed in this sphere, they would prove that African and European humanity were inseparable. Without a literary record, blacks seemed predestined for slavery.The small but dedicated groupnow known as the Black Atlantic writerswho stepped forward to meet this challenge published their autobiographies in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They not only defied the popular opinion of the time that blacks were unfit for letters, but inaugurated the Black American and Black British literary traditions.While slave narratives are often excerpted and anthologized, they are rarely collected in their entirety.Pioneers of the Black Atlanticis the first anthology to include the complete texts of the five most important and influential narratives of the eighteenth century. Included here are the writings of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, John Marrant, Ottobah Cugoano, Olaudah Equiano, and John Jea.Their stories, resonant still in our racially divided world, are landmarks in the history of autobiography and human rights.
Unpaid Annotation
In the eighteenth century, a small group of black men met the challenge of the Enlightenment by mastering the arts and sciences and writing themselves into history. The battle lines were clear-literacy stood as the ultimate measure of humanity to the white arbiters of Western culture. If blacks could succeed in this sphere, they would prove that African and European humanity were inseparable. Without a literary record, blacks seemed predestined for slavery. The small but dedicated group-now known as the Black Atlantic writers-who stepped forward to meet this challenge published their autobiographies in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They not only defied the popular opinion of the time that blacks were unfit for letters, but inaugurated the Black American and Black British literary traditions. While slave narratives are often excerpted and anthologized, they are rarely collected in their entirety. Pioneers of the Black Atlantic is the first anthology to include the completetexts of the five most important and influential narratives of the eighteenth century. Included here are the writings of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, John Marrant, Ottobah Cugoano, Olaudah Equiano, and John Jea. Their stories, resonant still in our racially divided world, are landmarks in the history of autobiography and human rights.
Unpaid Annotation
The complete texts of the most important & absorbing slave narratives in the African-American literary tradition.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Editor's Notep. xiii
Introduction the Talking Bookp. 1
A Narrative of The Most Remarkable Particulars In the Life Of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw An African Prince As Related by Himselfp. 30
The Preface to the Readerp. 33
Narrative of the Lord's Wonderful Dealings With John Marrant A Blackp. 60
Prefacep. 63
The Interesting Narrative Of the Life Of Olaudah Equiano Or Gustavus Vassa The African Written by Himselfp. 182
The Life, History, And Unparalleled Sufferings Of John Jea The African Preacher Compiled and Written by Himselfp. 366
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem