Catalogue


The Cuban revolution : origins, course, and legacy /
Marifeli Pérez-Stable.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
description
xv, 272 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0195127498 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
isbn
0195127498 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
2511397
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-03:
P'erez-Stable, a sociologist who left her native Cuba as a child in 1960, analyzes the sociopolitical and economic policies that have shaped revolutionary Cuba since 1959. Although she briefly sketches historical antecedents, which have been treated extensively in such standard works as James O'Connor's The Origins of Socialism in Cuba (CH, Mar'70) and Hugh Thomas's Cuba; the Pursuit of Freedom (CH, Dec'71), P'erez-Stable focuses on developments since 1970, when, she contends, the revolution ended. In considering the achievements and shortcomings of key projects intended to transform the Cuban economy and society, she draws from printed Cuban and US documents, interviews in Cuba during 1979, various newspaper and periodical sources, and the abundant secondary literature concerned with Castro's Cuba. Her balanced assessment represents a moderate position between, for example, Carmel Mesa-Lago's highly critical The Economy of Socialist Cuba (CH, Sep'82) and Andrew Zimbalist and Claes Brundenius's sympathetic The Cuban Economy: Measurement and Analysis of Socialist Performance (CH, Mar'90). Several tables, as well as an up-to-date and thorough bibliography, add to the value of her important monograph. Advanced undergraduates and above. J. A. Gagliano; Loyola University of Chicago
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1993-09-27:
In this scholarly overview, Perez-Stable analyzes the origins, development and the potential future of the Cuban revolution. Starting with a summary of Cuban politics before Castro's takeover, she investigates the formation of the Cuban Communist Party and its relation to the trade unions and the formidable Federation of Cuban Women, then takes a close look at the Rectification Campaign, launched in 1986, which sought to improve the failing Cuban economy. Perez-Stable also describes how the Cuban leadership is dealing with the gradual breakdown of socialism and the economic problems that have arisen since the end of the Cold War. Even in the face of the collapse of the Soviet Union and the loss of Cuba's lifeline to Moscow, the author insists that Washington is intent on undermining future prospects for political stability in the island nation. A study heavy with statistics, this authoritative work will be of interest primarily to specialists. Perez-Stable is an associate professor of sociology at the State University of New York. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An excellent and intellectually honest appraisal of how and why thesocialist dream collapsed in Cuba, laying responsibility where it belongs: atthe feet of the Cuban government."--Juan M. del Aguila, Emory University
"An excellent and intellectually honest appraisal of how and why the socialist dream collapsed in Cuba, laying responsibility where it belongs: at the feet of the Cuban government."--Juan M. del Aguila, Emory University
Praise for the previous edition
Praise for the previous edition:
Praise for the previous edition: "This is by far the best work I have read on contemporary Cuba. It is a competent study that strives for -- and achieves -- remarkable impartiality. The Cuban Revolution conveys the probing intelligence and profound thoughtfulness that produces permanence. It is a work no just for a single season but for a very long time." --Franklin W. Knight, The John Hopkins University "What we have in The Cuban Revolution is the most complete, sustained intellectual effort to do with the Cuban revolution what dozens of authors have done for the Mexican -- to indicate the native roots of the rebellion and, most importantly, to demonstrate how these roots were of primordial significance in determining the evolution of the revolution over the course of nearly haft a century. This is no small achievement, and it establishes Perez-Stable as a major voice in the study of Latin American politics and society." --Lars Schoultz, University of North Carolina
Praise for the previous edition: "This is by far the best work I have read on contemporary Cuba. It is a competent study that strives for -- and achieves -- remarkable impartiality.The Cuban Revolutionconveys the probing intelligence and profound thoughtfulness that produces permanence. It is a work no just for a single season but for a very long time." --Franklin W. Knight,The John Hopkins University "What we have inThe Cuban Revolutionis the most complete, sustained intellectual effort to do with the Cuban revolution what dozens of authors have done for the Mexican -- to indicate the native roots of the rebellion and, most importantly, to demonstrate how these roots were of primordial significance in determining the evolution of the revolution over the course of nearly haft a century. This is no small achievement, and it establishes P rez-Stable as a major voice in the study of Latin American politics and society." --Lars Schoultz,University of North Carolina
"This is by far the best work I have read on contemporary Cuba. It is a competent study that strives for -- and achieves -- remarkable impartiality. The Cuban Revolution conveys the probing intelligence and profound thoughtfulness that produces permanence. It is a work no just for a singleseason but for a very long time." --Franklin W. Knight, The John Hopkins University
"What we have in The Cuban Revolution is the most complete, sustained intellectual effort to do with the Cuban revolution what dozens of authors have done for the Mexican -- to indicate the native roots of the rebellion and, most importantly, to demonstrate how these roots were of primordialsignificance in determining the evolution of the revolution over the course of nearly haft a century. This is no small achievement, and it establishes Perez-Stable as a major voice in the study of Latin American politics and society." --Lars Schoultz, University of North Carolina
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Summaries
Main Description
This timely and provocative study provides a reexamination of the achievements and failures of the Cuban revolution, placing it firmly within the context of twentieth century Cuban history. Beginning with the inauguration of the republic in 1902 and addressing Castro's triumphant entry intoSantiago de Cuba in 1959, The Cuban Revolution highlights the factors which made Cuba susceptible to revolution, including its one-crop (sugar) economy and U.S. interference in Cuban affairs. While identifying nationalism and the struggle for social justice as the legitimate forces behind therevolution, Perez-Stable also provides insight into the problems facing Castro's Cuba. Arguing that the revolution actually ended in 1970, she blames its defeat on the regime's profitable yet doomed dependence on the Soviet Union. She further charges that Cuba's leaders failed to diversify thecountry's economy, to sustain development, or to create democratic institutions. Now in its second edition, The Cuban Revolution has been updated to include an entirely new chapter on the changes affecting Cuba's policies and economy since the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the failure of communism in general. The second edition also includes a new preface, anup-to-date bibliography, and a thoroughly revised concluding chapter summing up the prospects and possibilities of Cuba's future in the twenty-first century. Ideal for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in Latin American history and politics, The Cuban Revolution offers students freshinsights into the successes and failures of the Cuban Revolution.
Table of Contents
Tables
Preface
Preface to the First Edition
Acronyms
Introductionp. 3
Mediated Sovereignty, Monoculture, and Developmentp. 14
Politics and Society, 1902-1958p. 36
Revolution and Radical Nationalism, 1959-1961p. 61
Revolution and Inclusive Developmentp. 82
Politics and Society, 1961-1970p. 98
Politics and Society, 1971-1986p. 121
Revolution, Rectification, and Contemporary Socialismp. 153
The Invisible Crisis: Stability and Change in 1990s Cubap. 174
Conclusionp. 202
Notesp. 211
Select Bibliographyp. 249
Indexp. 268
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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